Author and Former Indiana First Lady to Appear at ISU Library Nov. 20

November 10 2006

Andrew Stoner
Andrew Stoner
TERRE HAUTE, Ind - Author Andrew Stoner will present a short program and sign his book, "Legacy of a Governor: The Life of Indiana's Frank O'Bannon," Monday, Nov. 20, at 2 p.m. in the browsing area of Indiana State University's Cunningham Memorial Library.

Accompanying Stoner will be former Indiana First Lady Judy O'Bannon. As first lady, O'Bannon promoted the arts, community development and historic preservation. She now chairs the Indiana 2016 Task Force; leads the O'Bannon Book Buddy program; served as honorary co-chair of Habitat for Humanity's 25th Anniversary; led a volunteer group to South Africa in 2001 to work with citizens; works on Indiana Main Street because of her interest in historic preservation; and has frequent public speaking engagements.

An Indiana University graduate with a degree in social work and an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree, Judy O'Bannon was the first woman to attend the Louisville Theological Seminary as a Rockefeller Theological Scholar.

Stoner served as O'Bannon's deputy press secretary from 2001-2003. For nine years, he oversaw communications for Indiana Family & Social Services and the Indiana State Department of Health, and also worked as a journalist and professor. He currently serves as director of marketing communications for M-Plan.

Growing up in Corydon, Frank O'Bannon developed qualities of the quintessential Hoosier - honest, hardworking, amicable. The skill of listening served him well in politics. When Robert O'Bannon retired from politics in 1970 after serving 20 years in the Indiana Senate, Frank O'Bannon won his father's vacant seat.

Judy O'Bannon
Judy O'Bannon
"Legacy of a Governor: The Life of Indiana's Frank O'Bannon," details the highs and lows of a career in politics.

- During the 1988 governor's race, O'Bannon put aside personal ambition to join 32-year-old Evan Bayh's ticket as lieutenant governor, which cemented the first gubernatorial Democratic victory in 20 years.

- Fighting an uphill battle during the 1996 election, the 66-year-old O'Bannon overcame an early deficit in the polls and the perception of being too old by skillfully delivering political ads in which he spoke one on one with voters.

- He skillfully guided a divided Indiana legislature to achieving a $2 billion surplus while cutting taxes, enacted several reforms in the state's education system, and pushed through important security measures after 9/11.

- O'Bannon failed to win legislation of the full-day kindergarten program and was publicly criticized for his administration's handling of the massive 1999-2000 fish kill in the White River in central Indiana.

"Legacy of a Governor" details Sept. 8, 2003, the day O'Bannon suffered a massive stroke, as stunned officials in Indianapolis made arrangements to transfer power to Lt. Governor Joe Kernan. O'Bannon died five days later.

The program and booksigning are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

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Contact and writer: Paula Meyer, ISU Communications & Marketing, (812) 237-3783, pmeyer4@isugw.indstate.edu

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Author Andrew Stoner will present a short program and sign his book, "Legacy of a Governor: The Life of Indiana's Frank O'Bannon," Monday, Nov. 20, at 2 p.m. in the browsing area of Indiana State University's Cunningham Memorial Library.

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