Trustees approve new health-related college

February 23 2007

Indiana State University's governing board on Friday (Feb. 23) approved creation of a new comprehensive college to serve the needs of health-related professions.

Acting on the recommendations of a campus-community task force and the university's chief academic officer, the Board of Trustees approved the College of Nursing, Health and Human Services, effective July 1.

The new college will incorporate programs currently housed in the College of Health and Human Performance and the College of Nursing, both of which will be dissolved June 30. Other health-related programs housed elsewhere, including in the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Education, may elect to be part of the new college, said C. Jack Maynard, provost and vice president of academic affairs.

"The field of health professions offers the potential for significant growth and we believe creating a new college will best position Indiana State University for that growth. It offers a new vision for health sciences on our campus," Maynard said.

"Establishing this new college recognizes the dynamics of the marketplace and the seamless delivery of health care," said Mike Alley, president of the ISU Board of Trustees. "Gov. Daniels has made a push to promote healthy lifestyles and the new College of Nursing, Health and Human Services is consistent with that message."

"We think of Terre Haute as being a retail center, but it is a very important health care center for a broad area of Indiana," said university President Lloyd W. Benjamin III. "It is vital for the state that we provide leadership in this area."

"The task force clearly stated that just 'merging' the existing colleges of Nursing and Health and Human Performance could negatively impact these programs, the faculty and our students. Clearly, we want to do everything we can to ensure the success of students and faculty," Maynard noted.

Creating the new college is viewed as the best way to provide the health professions with the resources, visibility, identity, and leadership opportunities needed to be successful, he said.

The 15-member task force met throughout the fall semester. Its members included faculty and students from the colleges of Health and Human Performance and Nursing, faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, and Wabash Valley health care providers. The task force found that "numerous universities have successfully formed comprehensive colleges of health to strengthen and support training in health professions."

The task force said a more comprehensive college focused on the health-related professions could:

  • increase visibility of health professions at ISU
  • empower faculty who advocate for health professions
  • promote greater collaboration between health-oriented units
  • attract external resources
  • initiate and develop new health-oriented programs
  • strengthen ties with community partners
  • better meet regional and state needs

Following the board's approval, Maynard said he will re-convene the task force and stressed that continued input from faculty, students and the health care community is vital for the success of the new college.

Also on Friday, trustees approved an approximate 6 percent increase in residence hall room and board for 2007-2008, to $6,671.72 per year for students with less than 56 credit hours (freshmen and sophomores). The increase is needed to fund increases in pay and benefits, increases in utilities and cable television, and an expanded meal plan, said Tom Ramey, vice president for student affairs.

As in the past, the rates for upper-class residence hall students would remain frozen at their sophomore level as long as sufficient academic progress is shown. At University Apartments, an average increase of $21.50 per month was approved.

In other action, the ISU Board of Trustees:

 

  • Recognized Donald E. Smith for his nearly 20 years of service on the board. The Terre Haute businessman announced his retirement as a trustee earlier this year, having served since 1987.
  • Asked the Indiana Commission for Higher Education, the State Budget Committee, the State Budget Agency and the governor to approve $2.4 million in projects to be funded from special funding approved by the Indiana General Assembly. The money is partial repayment of a general operating payment delay from the 2001-02 year and is restricted to repair and rehabilitation projects.

Contact: Teresa Exline, university spokesperson, Indiana State University, (812) 237-7783 or texline@indstate.edu

Writer: Dave Taylor, media relations director, Indiana State University, (812) 237-3743 or dave.taylor@indstate.edu

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Story Highlights

The ISU Board of Trustees has aproved a new comprehensive college to serve the needs of health-related professions. Acting on the recommendations of a campus-community task force and the university's chief academic officer, the board approved the College of Nursing, Health and Human Services. The existing colleges of Nursing and Health and Human Performance will be dissolved.

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