Trustees approve names for two colleges

By: ISU Communications and Marketing Staff, ISU Communications and Marketing Staff
October 23, 2009

 

Two colleges at Indiana State University have new names following action Friday by the university's governing board.

ISU trustees agreed to name the College of Education in honor of the political and educational legacy of the Bayh family and the College of Business for retired Terre Haute businessman Donald W. Scott.

 

Indiana State's first named colleges house two areas of study that trustees have previously recognized as programs of national distinction: teacher preparation and financial services education.

 

"Education is the ticket to a wider range of opportunities for Hoosiers, giving them the ability to secure their personal futures," Sen. Evan Bayh said. "Our roots with the extended ISU family run very deep. On behalf of the Bayh family, we are grateful to the trustees of ISU for this honor and for recognizing our shared mission of equal access to quality education and providing students with the crucial support and preparation they need to become successful teachers."

 

Indiana State officials noted that Sen. Bayh and his father, former Sen. Birch Bayh Jr., have championed educational issues. In addition, the senator's grandfather, Birch Bayh Sr., served as ISU's first athletic director and as physical education director for Washington, D.C. schools.

 

ISU President Dan Bradley said the Bayh family has been associated with the university for more than a century.

"The Bayhs have also been involved with educational policy and reform efforts for the last 40 years, so being able to put the Bayh name on our College of Education is a great honor," Bradley said.

The College of Education was recently recognized for having one of the top eight innovative teacher preparation programs in the country and Dean Brad Balch said he welcomes the college being named for the Bayhs.

"The opportunity to tie what we do in teacher education at Indiana State University to the Bayh family and its distinct reputation can only advance that great work," Balch said.

 

"We hope that it provides for us a place of national preeminence by combining that excellent programming with the wonderful and rich history that the Bayh family has with education."

 

The Donald W. Scott College of Business will honor the long-time owner of the former Sycamore Agency in Terre Haute, now Old National Insurance. Scott and his wife Susan have made a significant gift to the ISU Foundation that will help renovate the former Terre Haute Federal Building for use by the college.

"It's a great opportunity for us to move forward with the remodeling of the federal building and positions the College of Business to assume a greater role on the campus and in the region," Bradley said.

 

The Scott's gift to the ISU Foundation will enable the college to move forward in educational programs and facilities while preserving key historical elements of the Federal Building, including a courtroom mural depicting the signing of the Magna Carta, Dean Nancy Merritt said.

 

"We currently have facilities in a renovated residence hall that spans 11 stories. We have found that our students, faculty and others become somewhat isolated from one another," Merritt said. "The renovation of the Federal Building is designed to connect our students and faculty with community members and with each other. That will enable us to engage the students more in business development and business management practices, in financial services industry, and in our other disciplines across the college."

Sen. Bayh was instrumental in securing the Federal Building for use by the Scott College of Business.

The new names for the Colleges of Education and Business take effect immediately. Dedication ceremonies are planned for next spring.

In other action, ISU trustees:
• Authorized university officials to seek state approval to renovate Pickerl Hall residence hall at a cost not to exceed $10 million as part of an ongoing plan to improve campus housing
• Approved construction of the first phase of a pedestrian walkway on a recently closed block of Chestnut Street to serve newly renovated University Hall and the Nursing Building at a cost not to exceed $776,000
• Approved a name change for the department of geography, geology and anthropology to department of earth and environmental systems
• Approved a revised academic calendar for 2010-11 that moves fall break to Oct. 15 from Oct. 8.

Photos: http://isuphoto.smugmug.com/photos/394665765_fWNxL-L.jpg - Sen. Evan Bayh speaks at ISU's Hulman Center during his 2009 Job Fair and Small Business Summit (ISU/Kara Berchem)http://isuphoto.smugmug.com/photos/687974542_R4Wjw-L.jpg - Birch Bayh Sr., grandfather of U.S. Sen. Evan Bayh, a 1917 graduate of Indiana State Normal School, was the school's first athletic director. He was named a Distinguished Alumnus of the university in 1968. (Indiana State University Archives)

http://isuphoto.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Trustees-Naming/DSC4442Naming/689978540_wbXqf-L.jpg - Donald W. Scott addresses ISU trustees following their action approving the naming of the College of Business in his honor. http://isuphoto.smugmug.com/Other/Media-Services/Trustees-Naming/DSC4434Naming/689977870_mkh3e-L.jpg - Nancy Merritt, dean of the Donald W. Scott College of Business, presents Scott with a jacket bearing the college's new name.

 

 

Media contact and writer: Dave Taylor, media relations director, Office of Communications and Marketing, Indiana State University, 812-237-3743 or dave.taylor@indstate.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Story Highlights

College of Education to recognize education and political legacy of Indiana's Bayh family while the College of Business is named for long time Terre Haute businessman Donald W. Scott

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