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Cybercriminology and Security Studies Major

Begins Fall of 2018

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Cybercriminology and Security Studies with a concentration in cybercrime or a concentration in physical security is designed to equip students with a strong baseline understanding of a growing category of 21st century crime.  The purpose of the B.S. degree in Cybercriminology and Security Studies is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of national, corporate, and cyber security theories and practices, and to prepare them to operate on a supervisory level within security, law enforcement, and business environments.

The events of 9/11 changed the way Americans look at all aspects of public safety.  The need for resilient security professionals who are prepared to deal with every facet of national, homeland, corporate, and cyber security has never been greater.  Students earning a B.S. degree in Cybercriminology and Security Studies will be prepared to take leadership roles in diverse areas of security.  B.S. degree holders will have the ability to pursue terminal degrees in private security leadership, cybercrime and security, and other related fields.

Cybercriminology and Security Studies Faculty

Credit Hours Required
The major in Security Studies consists of 51 credit hours (21 hours core courses, 24 credit hours concentration course work, and 6 credit hours directed electives).

1. Cybercrime Concentration
Under this concentration, students will develop the ability to analyze, investigate, and respond to digital threats (virtual crimes).

2. Physical Security Concentration
Under this concentration, students will develop the ability to analyze the global complexities and implications of corporate security, retail security, loss prevention, overall procedures, and operations.

Core Courses (21 credit hours):

CRIM 150 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRIM 200 - Criminology (3 credits)
CRIM 220 - Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 credits)
CRIM 420 - Criminal Law and Procedure (3 credits)
CRIM 435 - Criminal Investigation (3 credits)
CRIM 440 - Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRIM 499 –Danger and Disorder: Critical Issues in Criminology (3 credits)

Cybercrime Concentration (24 credit hours)

CSS 130 Cyber Fundamentals I (3 credits)
or CS 101 Fundamentals of Computing (3 credits)
CSS 131 Cyber Fundamentals II (3 credits)
or CS 151 Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)
CSS 235 Introduction to Computer Forensics I
CSS 236 Introduction to Computer Forensics II (3 credits)
CSS 330 Introduction to Security and Risk Analysis (3 credits)
CSS 331 Files and Database Systems (3 credits)
or MIS 420 Data and Knowledge Management (3 credits)
CSS 332 Information Systems Security (3 credits)
or MIS 350 Information Security (3 credits)
CSS 430 Cyber Security (3 credits)
CSS 431 Cyber Warfare (3 credits)
CSS 432 Forensic Accounting (3 credits)
or BUS 201 Principles of Accounting (3 credits)
or ACCT 200 Survey of Accounting (3 credits)
CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
CRIM 497 Individual Directed Studies (3 credits)
CRIM 498 Internship in Criminology (3 credits)
INAN 330 Cybercrime (3 credits)

Cybercrime Concentration Electives (6 credit hours)

SS 210 Introduction to Networking (3 credits)
CSS 211 Introduction to Computer Science (3 Credits)
CSS 310 Cyber Crime Investigation (3 credits)
CSS 312 Windows Internet Trace Evidence (3 credits)
CSS 410 Cyber Law and Privacy in a Digital Age (3 credits)
CSS 411 Cyber Threat Analysis (3 credits)
CSS 427 Cyber Criminology (3 credits)
CSS 435 Social Engineering (3 credits)
INAN 350 Crime Analysis (3 credits)
INAN 386 Criminal Profiling (3 credits)
INAN 410 Terrorism (3 credits)
CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
CRIM 419 White-Collar Crime (3 credits)
CRIM 497 Individual Directed Studies (3 credits)
CRIM 498 Internship in Criminology (3 credits)

Physical Security Concentration (24 credit hours)

CRIM 201 Institutional, Industrial, and Commercial Security (3 credits)
CRIM 203 Crime Prevention (3 credits)
CRIM 315 Techniques of Criminal Justice Interviewing (3 credits)
CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
CRIM 497 Individual Directed Studies (3 credits)
CRIM 498 Internship in Criminology (3 credits)
CSS 221 Introduction to Security Management (3 credits)
CSS 222 Introduction to Private Security (3 credits)
CSS 223 Introduction to Loss Prevention (3 credits)
CSS 321 School and Campus Security (3 credits)
CSS 322 Border and Coastal Security (3 credits)
CSS 323 Transportation Systems Security (3 credits)
CSS 420 Workplace Safety/OSHA (3 credits)
or HRD 394 Occupational Liability and Safety (3 credits)
CSS 421 Protective Services (3 credits)
CSS 422 Fraud Investigation (3 credits)

Physical Security Concentration Electives (6 credit hours)

CRIM 202 Retail Security (3 credits)
CRIM 396 Introduction to Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
CRIM 419 White-Collar Crime (3 credits)
CRIM 497 Individual Directed Studies (3 credits)
CRIM 498 Internship in Criminology (3 credits)
CSS 335 Principles of Retail Investigations (3 credits)
CSS 423 Retail Accounting and Inventory Control (3 credits)
CSS 424 Loss Prevention Data Analysis (3 credits)

CORE COURSE DESCRIPTION

CRIM 150 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3 credits)
A study of the agencies and processes involved in the criminal justice system: the courts, the police, the prosecutor, the public defender, and corrections.

CRIM 200 Criminology (3 credits)
A consideration of criminality, its nature and extent, particularly in the United States; and an analysis of the etiology of criminal behavior, criminal law, and societal reactions to criminals.

CRIM 220 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3 credits)
Philosophical and historical background of law enforcement at the federal, state, county, city, and village levels. An introduction to contemporary police organizations and methods of operation.

CRIM 420 Criminal Law and Procedure (3 credits)
An analysis of the history and development of the criminal law as a system of social control; the scope, purpose, and general principles of criminal law; and the essential characteristics of various crimes.

CRIM 435 Criminal Investigation (3 credits)
This course examines the organization and functions of investigative agencies, basic considerations in the investigation of crime, collection and preservation of physical evidence, elements of legal proof in the submission of evidence, and investigation of specific types of offenses.

CRIM 440 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
A study of ethics, crime, and the criminal justice system. This course explores a variety of theoretical perspectives relative to the study of ethical behavior and then applies this discussion to the practice of law enforcement and corrections.

CRIM 499 Danger and Disorder: Critical Issues in Criminology (3 credits)
This course examines crime, justice, and civic life from historical, comparative, social science, and contemporary cultural perspectives. Topics include law and society, violence in America, criminal subcultures, drug policy, essential issues in criminal justice, mass media and crime, and citizen involvement in criminal justice.

Cybercrime Concentration: Course Descriptions

ACCT 200 Survey of Accounting (3 credits)
Principles of financial and managerial accounting for students in technology, social sciences, health, and other applied areas. Emphasis on role of accounting in organizational decisions.

BUS 201 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits)
An introduction to financial accounting and how statements are used for decision making. Emphasis is placed on asset and liability measurement, reporting, and income determination.

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
Consideration is given to a specific area of criminology. Course is offered for credit or non-credit, and for in-service or pre-service students. A different topic is selected for each symposium.

CRIM 419 White-Collar Crime (3 credits)
Course Description: This course provides an overview of the nature, extent, causes, costs, and control of corporate and white-collar crime.

CRIM 497 Individual Directed Study (3 credits)
An individual study of a particular area or problem in security studies as decided upon by the student and the instructor. An outline of the proposed study must be submitted to the instructor for approval prior to enrollment in the course.

CRIM 498 Internship (3-6 credits)
Students engage in a period of employment (minimum of 200 hours for 3 credits) as a security analyst with government, international agency, or corporation during which certain experience objectives in security studies must be met.

CS 101 Fundamentals of Computing (3 credits)
Covers the core competencies in three areas: information technology basics, hardware/software, and information retrieval and evaluation. Provides students with the basic information management skills necessary to function in an electronic academic environment.

CS 151 Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)
History of computers and computer science, principles of process description and problem analysis. The basic structures of sequence, iteration, and selection. Programming style, artificial intelligence, current applications.

CSS 130 Cyber Fundamentals I (3 credits)
This course covers computer hardware and peripherals and other digital media used in commission of cybercrimes. It examines devices, including building, configuring, upgrading, troubleshooting, and diagnosis computers.

CSS 131 Cyber Fundamentals II (3 credits)
This course is a continuation of Computer Science I. It focuses on abstract data types and their implementations, binary files, introductory algorithm analysis, software engineering concepts, and the application and uses of dynamic data structures. Prerequisite: CSS 230

CSS 210 Introduction to Networking (3 credits)
Topic include network types and communication models, hardware components, applications, protocols, standards, internetworking and routing concepts, OSI Model, TCP/IP, LAN and WAN networking technologies.

CSS 211 Introduction to Computer Science (3 credits)
This course focuses on the foundation for the study of computer system security. The course centers around the domains comprising the information security common body of knowledge. Students will learn the security management practices as well as security architecture and models security laws, and investigations.

CSS 235 Introduction to Computer Forensics I (3 credits)
This course focuses on the foundation of computer forensics. It prepares students how to obtain and analyze digital information for possible use as evidence in civil, criminal or administrative cases. Its primary focus is on digital information retrieval methods.

CSS 236 Introduction to Computer Forensics II (3 credits)
This course focuses on advanced concepts and techniques in cyber environment of computer forensic analysis. It introduces students to more applied concentrations of discovering, recovering, preserving, and analyzing volatile and nonvolatile information from digital devices. Prerequisite: CSS 235 CSS 310 Cyber Crime Investigation (3 credits) An in-depth study of the theory and practice of digital forensics. Topics include computer forensics, network forensics, cell phone forensics, and other types of digital forensics. Discussion also covers identification, collection, acquisition, authentication, preservation, examination, analysis, and presentation of evidence for prosecution purposes.

CSS 312 Windows Internet Trace Evidence (3 credits)
This course is designed to teach the recovery of trace evidence left on a computer system as a result of using the Internet. It covers information about the use of Internet Explorer, FireFox, Chrome, Safari, Opera and several internet related tools such as Skype, and P2P clients.

CSS 330 Introduction to Security and Risk Analysis (3 credits)
This introductory course spans areas of security, risk, and analysis covering contexts in government agencies and business organizations.

CSS 331 Files and Database Systems (3 credits)
This course introduces the basic database concepts. The course stresses the implementation of databases in the real world. Students learn about basic database design and terminology, and learn how to create a variety of databases using MS Access.

CSS 332 Information Systems Security (3 credits)
Information Systems Security examines how to successfully defend and protect today’s valuable resource (e.g., information and information systems). It covers a systematic and practical approach for establishing, managing and operating a comprehensive information assurance program.

CSS 410 Cyber Law and Privacy in a Digital Age (3 credits)
This course examines how laws have had to change to account for the expanded realm of crimes in the digital age. Additionally, this course will explore specific problems in applying law to cyberspace in areas such as intellectual property, privacy, content control, and the bounds of jurisdiction.

CSS 411 Cyber Threat Analysis (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the methodology of investigation and analysis procedures associated in the application of real world cyber attacks. Students will gain knowledge of key terminology, online tools used by analysts, the development of legislation, key government agency roles, and the nature of cyber threats/attacks.

CSS 427 Cyber Criminology (3 credits)
This course examines the application of traditional and new criminological theory to modern cybercrimes and cybercriminals.

CSS 430 Cyber Security (3 credits)
An introduction to cyber security and the relationship to organizations and society. Topics include multiple cyber security environments, technologies, processes, and concepts. The analysis of threats and risks to/in these environments, and the development of appropriate strategies to mitigate potential security impacts in the modern information environment will be discussed.

CSS 431 Cyber Warfare (3 credits)
This course covers issues related to domestic and international threats to cybercrime and terror including causes and prevention.

CSS 432 Forensic Accounting (3 credits)
A study of the theoretical framework for accounting principles and procedures, the application of GAAP, and accounting for current assets, fixed assets, and revenue recognition.

CSS 435 Social Engineering (3 credits)
This course provides an examination of modern human/behavioral tactics of deceit and/or persuasion, typically used to infiltrate businesses in order to gain network access. Specific focus will be given to prevention and employee training.

INAN 330 Cybercrime (3 credits)
This course covers a wide range of criminal activities in which computers or computer networks are uses as tools to target individuals, corporations, or government institutions. It covers topics such as electronic crime, information crime, virtual crime, and an overview of cyber weaponry, various offensive and defensive strategies.

INAN 350 Crime Analysis (3 credits)
This course is designed to enhance the analytical and research skills of those individuals intending careers within the criminal justice system and homeland defense areas. Course objectives include 1) turning police raw data into intelligence, 2) further enhancing critical thinking and communication skills, 3) to examine the offender, victim, and situational elements surrounding major forms of crime, and 4) to acquire spatial and temporal analysis skills necessary to conduct research and analytical projects once employed.

INAN 386 Criminal Profiling (3 credits)
This course examines the dynamics of individual criminal acts utilizing inductive and deductive methodology to profile criminal behavior, offender characteristics, crime scene investigation, evidence collection, and case linkage of specific categories of crimes. Topical areas in this course will include homicide, serial crime, stalking, and other criminal behaviors and acts.

INAN 410 Terrorism (3 credits)
This course fosters an understanding of the roots, development, and the impact of contemporary worldwide terrorism, especially in the United States, while using a simulated operational environment.

MIS 350 Information Security (3 credits)
An introduction to the field of information security with emphasis on security management. Coverage includes legal, ethical, and professional issues; methods of access; personnel and social engineering concerns; risk management; security technology; incident response; disaster recovery; and other issues.

MIS 420 Data and Knowledge Management (3 credits)
This course covers the role of information technology in capturing, storing, retrieving, analyzing, representing, and using data. Students learn appropriate theory and techniques associated with each of the steps in utilizing data, information, and knowledge to make good decisions. Emphasis is on data warehousing, data mining, and knowledge bases. Physical Security Concentration: Course Descriptions

CRIM 201 Institutional, Industrial, and Commercial Security (3 credits)
This course focuses on the overview of all-hazards approach to industrial security, site-specific vulnerability assessment, development of emergency action plans, loss prevention in industrial security, terrorist threats, and prevention of workplace violence.

CRIM 202 Retail Security (3 credits)
Emphasizes the identification and development of physical security objectives, policies, procedures, and methods necessary to achieve efficient and effective retail security measures.

CRIM 303 Crime Prevention (3 credits)
Provides an overview of types of crime prevention programs that can be implemented by police departments; retail, commercial, or individual firms; and community action groups and individual citizens.

CRIM 315 Techniques of Interviewing and Interrogation (3 credits)
This course explores (a) the interviewing and interrogation techniques, (b) legal restrictions on interrogations, and (c) techniques and technology related to the detection of truth and deception. This course also examines the legal and ethical issues of the use of interview and interrogation techniques to acquire intelligence information from suspects and its concomitant impact on criminal prosecutions, veracity of information, and public policy.

CRIM 396 Introduction to Research in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
This course focuses on the methods and techniques used to prevent and reduce losses due to theft and casualty. Consideration of the security survey; communication and surveillance systems; control of personnel and visitors; the use, supervision, and training of security forces; handling civil disturbances in public buildings; and other emergencies.

CRIM 416 Symposium on Criminology (3 credits)
Consideration is given to a specific area of criminology. Course is offered for credit or non-credit, and for in-service or pre-service students. A different topic is selected for each symposium.

CRIM 419 White-Collar Crime (3 credits)
Course Description: This course provides an overview of the nature, extent, causes, costs, and control of corporate and white-collar crime.

CRIM 497 Individual Directed Study (3 credits)
An individual study of a particular area or problem in security studies as decided upon by the student and the instructor. An outline of the proposed study must be submitted to the instructor for approval prior to enrollment in the course.

CRIM 498 Internship (3-6 credits)
Students engage in a period of employment (minimum of 200 hours for 3 credits) as a security analyst with government, international agency, or corporation during which certain experience objectives in security studies must be met.

CSS 221 Introduction to Security Management (3 credits)
An introductory course designed to familiarize students with the security profession and measures. Emphasis is placed on security industry terminology. Topics include privatization of public safety, use of technology and physical security, contract and proprietary security, executive protection, special event security, access control, integrated security systems, and assessing organizational vulnerabilities.

CSS 222 Introduction to Private Security (3 credits)
This course will cover the development, role, responsibility, limitations and liabilities of the private security industry in the contemporary society. It covers describing the relationship between private security professionals, law enforcement and representatives of the legal system.

CSS 223 Introduction to Loss Prevention (3 credits)
This course covers issues related to internal and external theft that affect all private and public operations, with focus on retail businesses. Examines and evaluates major loss prevention programs used by security operations, with primary focus on retail security.

CSS 321 School and Campus Security (3 credits)
This course explores risk management and emergency management protocols, the threat assessment process, crisis and recovery measures in school settings. It explores preparedness for managing every day security issues in schools while planning for high impact scenarios such as terrorism and active shooter/ mass casualty incidents.

CSS 322 Border and Coastal Security (3 credits)
A study of the federal, state and local organizations involved in border and coastal security, associated homeland security issues, the various policy and operational strategies used for border and coastal access and security. Contemporary border and coastal security concerns as well as immigration and non-U.S. approaches are addressed.

CSS 323 Transportation Systems Security (3 credits)
Focus on organizational risks through an examination of air, sea and land transportation systems. Acquisition and analysis of information necessary to support decision-makers in the protection of assets and allocation of security resources is reviewed. Risk management process, asset identification, threat and vulnerability identification and assessment, and cost-benefit analysis are examined.

CSS 335 Principles of Retail Investigations (3 credits)
This course explores the scope and impact of employee theft within the retail industry. Specific investigative techniques related to cash theft, under-ringing, refund fraud and credit fraud are covered, along with victim/witness interview techniques and completing concise and detailed investigative narratives.

CSS 420 Workplace Safety/OSHA (3 credits)
This course covers the basics of occupational safety management in the manufacturing environment as they relate to hazard identification, and accident investigation and training. It covers the minimum requirements under Federal OSHA and State OSHA.

CSS 421 Protective Services (3 credits)
An overview of executive protection services. Topics include basic principles, threat assessment, risk analysis, training, employment, organization and management of a protective services detail, working the principal, home and office security, technological considerations, vehicle security, domestic and international travel, firearms selection and training, and self-defense fundamentals.

CSS 422 Fraud Investigation (3 credits)
This course covers the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. The course includes topics such as skimming, cash larceny, check tampering, register disbursement schemes, billing schemes, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, and interviewing witnesses.

CSS 423 Retail Accounting and Inventory Control (3 credits)
This course introduces the principles of retail accounting and inventory shrink for loss prevention professionals.

CSS 424 Loss Prevention Data Analysis (3 credits)
This course focuses on the basic concepts and the practical application of analysis within the realm of retail loss prevention. Emphasis is placed on the fundamentals of analysis, giving the loss prevention professional insight into the validity of research encountered within the professional world.

HRD 394 Occupational Liability and Safety (3 credits)
The investigation of the safety environment. Safety terminology, hazards, and the need for safety training programs are included.

Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice