3.1 Misconduct Against Persons

Students at Indiana State University are expected to conduct themselves in a respectful and civil manner. Personal conduct and communication, either directly or indirectly with other students as well as faculty and staff, should conform to the University’s community values and standards. As members of the at-large community, students are encouraged to resolve disagreements through informal, frank, and open discussion. Often conflicts can be lessened, if not resolved, by clearing up misperceptions and misunderstandings. Students are strongly encouraged to resolve any related concerns in this manner. However, the University also recognizes that occasionally more formal processes are needed. All such activities, whether informal or formal, must be carried out by all participants within a framework of good faith and general respect for one another. Students are encouraged to contact SCI for assistance or guidance in resolving any concerns or conflicts. Conflicts may be resolved through established disciplinary procedures and/or conflict resolution strategies.

It is an expectation of the University that students have a reasonable knowledge of and adhere to the following prohibited conduct and policies:

  • 3.1.1 Violence/Abusive Behavior refers to physical abuse/ violence or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person.
  • 3.1.2 Threatening/Intimidating Behavior refers to behavior (reoccurring or singular extreme act) that involves an expressed or implied threat, which includes, but is not limited to the use of words verbal, written, or electronic (e.g. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Vine, Twitter) inherently likely to provide an immediate violent reaction when directed toward a specific individual, or any behavior that has the purpose or reasonably foreseeable effect of creating a hostile environment by, but not limited to, interfering with another individual’s personal safety, safety of property, academic efforts, employment, or participation in University-sponsored activities and causes that person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to occur.
  • 3.1.6 Hazing is prohibited in connection with the activities of students and student organizations. Hazing shall be defined as any conduct which subjects another person, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or psychologically, to anything that may abuse, degrade, or intimidate the person as a condition of association with an organization or group (formal or informal), regardless of the person’s consent or lack of consent.
  • 3.1.7 Restricting Movement refers to any activity that limits or restricts a person(s) against his/her own will and/or restricts his/her freedom of movement.

Information regarding Stalking, Sexual Misconduct (including Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment), Intimate Partner Violence (See Appendix G for directions to full policy, definitions, and procedures)

The University approved in June 2015, policies and procedures for all students, faculty, staff, and visitors on Stalking, Sexual Misconduct, and Intimate Partner Violence. Stalking, Sexual Misconduct, and Intimate Partner Violence are defined below:

Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (A) fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or (B) suffer substantial emotional distress. (See Appendix G for expanded information)

Sexual Misconduct includes both sexual harassment and sexual violence, as defined below. (See Appendix G)

  • Sexual harassment refers to the unwelcome imposition of sexual attention often in the context of a relationship of unequal power. The policy applies to men and women equally and encompasses both heterosexual and same sex harassment. Sexual harassment is any conduct, physical or verbal, that is sexual in nature and which has the effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s or a group’s educational or work performance, or which creates an intimidating, hostile, or abusive educational or work environment. It can include unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature made by someone from or in the workplace or educational setting.
  • Sexual Violence is any sexual act that is perpetrated against someone's will. Sexual violence encompasses a range of offenses, including but not limited to a completed or attempted nonconsensual sex act (i.e., rape), abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g., threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment). All types involve victims who do not consent, or who are unable to consent or refuse to allow the act), abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g., threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment). All types involve victims who do not consent, or who are unable to consent or refuse to allow the act.

Intimate partner violence - sometimes referred to as domestic battery or dating violence -describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur between individuals of heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy. Intimate partner violence can vary in frequency and severity. It occurs on a continuum, ranging from verbal abuse that may or may not impact the victim to chronic, severe battering. (See Appendix G) There are four main types of intimate partner violence including but not limited to:

  • Physical Violence is the intentional use of physical force with the potential for causing death, disability, or injury. Physical violence includes, but is not limited to, scratching; pushing; shoving; throwing; grabbing; biting; choking; shaking; slapping; punching; burning; use of a weapon; and use of restraints or one's body, size, or strength against another person.
  • Sexual Violence is any sexual act that is perpetrated against someone's will. Sexual violence encompasses a range of offenses, including but not limited to a completed or attempted nonconsensual sex act (i.e., rape), abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g., threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment). All types involve victims who do not consent, or who are unable to consent or refuse to allow the act), abusive sexual contact (i.e., unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g., threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment). All types involve victims who do not consent, or who are unable to consent or refuse to allow the act.
  • Threats of Physical or Sexual Violence. The use of words, gestures, or weapons to communicate the intent to cause death, disability, or injury.
  • Psychological/Emotional Violence involves trauma to the victim caused by acts, threats of acts, or coercive tactics. Psychological/emotional abuse can include, but is not limited to, humiliating the victim, controlling what the victim can and cannot do, withholding information from the victim, deliberately doing something to make the victim feel diminished or embarrassed, isolating the victim from friends and family, and denying the victim access to money or other basic resources. It is also considered psychological/emotional violence when there has been prior physical or sexual violence or prior threat of physical or sexual violence.

Confidential resources are available as outlined by the federal mandate and the policy. Please note, unless a person falls in the category of confidential resource, many faculty/staff are considered responsible employees. This means they are required to report to the Title IX coordinator any allegation of sexual misconduct.

Investigations and resolution procedures regarding allegations of these policies are resolved through the Title IX process.

An online report form is available through the Equal Opportunity and Title IX Office.

Contact

Student Conduct and Integrity
Hulman Memorial Student Union
Room 821
Office: 812.237.3800