Sustainability

Our Mission

The Institute for Community Sustainability (ICS) was funded in February 2012 through Indiana State University's Unbounded Possibilities initiative. In 2018, ICS was renamed to the Office of Sustainability to improve on campus exposure. The Office of Sustainability’s mission is to promote environmental responsibility and economic vitality, while fostering society equity on campus and in the surrounding communities. The office provides opportunities for all students and community members, regardless of degree or field of work, to improve their understanding of how they can advance sustainability in the modern world.

Who We Are

Sustainability Coordinator

Nick McCreary has been with ISU since July 2017. McCreary is a native Hoosier with a B.A. in Earth Sciences and a M.S. in Sustainability.

Graduate Assistant

Garrett Hurley joined the team in August 2018. Garrett, originally from Oregon, has a B.S. in Speech Communication and a B.S. in Psychology. He is currently a M.S. candidate in Student Affairs & Higher Education. Garrett is the lead on the following projects: Benchmarking, Energy Competitions, and New Student Transitions.

Undergraduate Project Manager

Kaitlin “Jewel” Childress is a senior from Terre Haute, IN - she is studying Recreation and Sports Management. Jewel is our main liaison with ISU’s student body via the student group Sycamore Environmental Action Club. She works on many other projects including Earth Day, Green Guides, and Food Waste Reduction.

Undergraduate Project Manager

Caleb Law is senior from Greenwood, IN – He is studying Manufacturing Engineering. Caleb is our master of all things bikes and marketing, but like our entire team he has his hand in many projects.

Community Garden Manager

Patti Weaver has been the driving force for the Indiana State University community garden since it was established in 2009. Under her guidance the garden has tripled in size – simply put, the garden would not be possible without her dedication.

Community Garden Student Worker

Christiana Wittenmyer is our Senior Community Garden Student Worker. She will graduate in May with a degree in Music Education. Christiana works hard during the growing season to keep weeds manageable and gardeners happy, in the off season she helps around the office and planning for the upcoming garden season.

Volunteers

Even with our amazing staff, The Office of Sustainability is driven by student and community volunteers. The ISU Community Garden would be a weed infested jungle with countless volunteer hours from both our gardeners and community memebers. Through The Office of Sustainability, students have excellence oppertunities for experiential learning. We are always working on a variety of projects, and will never have enough help or input. If you are a student, who has a passion for sustainability or just needs volunteer hours, we have something for you! Volunteering with the office will be a rewarding experience as you will be empowered to lead your own project. Through experiential learning we are able to provide students a unique education with real world applications, it also helps the office accompliush our goals.If you would like to volunteer, in any capacity, please contact Nick McCreary at nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu

The Garden House

In 2009 ISU made the decision to turn the 11th and Chestnut city block into a community garden – of the vacant houses the Garden House was selected for renovation, with all other structures designated for demolition. In 2012, the building was given to The Institute for Community Sustainability for use as an office space. Most recently in 2018, the Garden House was outfitted with a 6.6 watt roof mounted solar array and a 12L bio-digester. Sustainability was paramount during the office rehab, the Garden House’s sustainability features can be found in this pamphlet.

The Garden House is always available as a meeting and gathering space for the community and campus; if you are interested in using the space please contact Nick McCreary (Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu). The interior of the house can comfortably fit 20 people, users are welcome to utilize our full kitchen (you must provide your own food, local preferred), and the office is equipped with an overhead projector. The back deck can accommodate around an additional 20 people. to edit

Achievements

2013 - ISU was a finalist for the 4th Annual Second Nature Climate Leadership Awards

2013 – ISU was ranked as one of 322 Green Schools by The Princeton Review

2014 – ISU was given a Silver Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) rating from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

2014 – ISU was ranked as one of 322 Green Schools by The Princeton Review

2014 – ISU was recognized at the City of Terre Haute's first annual Arbor Day awards ceremony with the Outstanding Educational Institution Award

2015 - ISU was ranked as one of 322 Green Schools by The Princeton Review

2015 – ISU was named one of Sierra Club’s Cool Schools

2015 – ISU was ranked the #5 green college in the Midwest by Do Amore

2015 – ISU was recognized by Indiana Wildlife Federation (IWF) as a Gold Level Conservation Champion for our commitment to landscaping the sustainable campus

2016 – ISU was named a top 11 place to celebrate Earth Day in The US by Leaf Filter

2016 - ISU was a finalist for the 7th Annual Second Nature Climate Leadership Awards

2016 – ISU received the Students Actions Award from Purposeful Networks

2016 – ISU placed 1st in Indiana: Paper, Corrugated Cardboard, and Bottles and Cans by the Indiana Recycling Coalition

2017 – ISU was ranked as one of 353 Green Schools by The Princeton Review

2017 – ISU was named one of Sierra Club’s Cool Schools

2017 – ISU was given a Silver STARS rating from AASHE

2017 – ISU was ranked 5th in the US for water conservation by AASHE

2018 – ISU was named one of Sierra Club’s Cool Schools

2018 – ISU was ranked as one of 375 Green Schools by The Princeton Review

The Office of Sustainability is driven by experiential learning projects and volunteer work. If you would like to work with us on anything, reach out! We love nothing more than taking what students are learning in class and applying it to better our campus and community. Additionally, we always need volunteers in the garden and for different events and projects. If you would like to work with the office or volunteer reach out to Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu

Below is a calendar showing our events, projects, and happenings.

Sustainability Fellows

The ISU Sustainability Fellowship Program exists to both advance sustainability in the region and on campus through interdisciplinary, experiential, results oriented projects. Each Fellow is responsible for leading one project per year. Additionally, Fellows act as an on campus advisory board for the Office of Sustainability.

Fellows meet monthly for an hour and half - the first portion of each meeting consists of a book discussion, meant to spur conversation around sustainability topics relevant to campus and the Wabash Valley.  During the section portion of each meeting, Fellows will advise the Office of Sustainability. If you are interested in becoming a fellow please contact Nick McCreary at Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu, applications open in July for the fall semester and December for the spring semester.

Fall 18 Fellows, reading Active Hope by Joanna Macy & Chris Johnstone

Katya Drake - Student

Emily Tickle - Student

Onyah Allen - Student

Steve Hardin – Public Services Librarian

Dr. Tina Kruger – Associate Professor and Chair of Multidisciplinary Studies

Stephanie Krull – Landscape & Grounds Manager

Ashley Baysinger – Undergraduate Student

Cayle Moreo – Biology Research Coordinator and Graduate Student

Julia Linton – Undergraduate Student

Katie Lugar – Assistant Director of Student Programming & Leadership

Katie Uttich – Assistant Director of Residential Life

Dr. Jen Latimer – Professor of Geology

Dr. Jim Speer – Professor of Geology

Past Fellows

Eric Anderson - Lecturer in the College of Arts and Sciences – Founding Fellow

Jordan Bayles - Sodexo's Former Catering Executive Chef – Fellow 2014

Dr. Susan Berta - Associate Professor of Geography – Founding Fellow

Dr. Shikha Bhattacharyya – Student – Fellow 2015

Dr. Lisa Calvin – Professor of Spanish – Fellow 2015

Dr. Aruna Chandrasekaran – Professor of Management – Fellow 2015

Dr. Tom Derrick – Professor of English – Founding Fellow

Travis Dickey – Student – Fellow 2015

Dr. Elonda Ervin – Director of Multicultural Services and Programs at ISU – Fellow 2015

Heather Foxx – Student – Fellow 2013

Gail Gottschling – Director of ISU’s Early Childhood Education Center – Fellow 2014

Dr. Debra Israel – Professor of Economics – Founding Fellow

Jipin Jose – Student – Fellow 2016

Polina Kaniuka – Student – Fellow 2016

Kris Kraut – Sodexo’s Former Residential Dining Executive Chef – fellow 2014

Tracy Machtan – Former Assistant director of Fraternity and Sorority Life – Fellow 2014

Zachariah Mathew – Assistant Director of ISU’s Center for Global Engagement – Fellow 2016

Dara Middleton – Events Coordinator for Cunningham Memorial Library – Fellow 2014

Brookes Moore – Associate Vice President of Student Affairs – Fellow 2015

Zachary Nickerson – Student – Fellow 2015

Dr. Joy O’Keefe – Director of ISU’s Center for Bat research, Outreach, and Conservation – Founding Fellow

Ali Pavlicek – Student – Fellow 2014

Rhonda Reed - Director of the Learning Resources Center in the College of Health and Human Services – Fellow 2016

Dr. Tom Steiger - Director of ISU's Center for Student Research and Creativity – Founding Fellow

Dr. Larry Tinnerman - Assistant Professor of Curriculum, Instruction, and Media Technology – Founding Fellow

Sycamore Environmental Action Club

The purpose of The Sycamore Environmental Action Club (SEAC) is to offer a supportive space where students can embody environmental and social responsibility, creating a more desirable future for ourselves, the people around us, and the spaces we live. At weekly meetings, students will be offered an opportunity to openly discuss pressing, mindfulness, and/or consciousness topics that have been prevalent to the members lately.  Outside of the meetings, members will take action on initiatives and projects that align with the group’s goals and frequent the Sycamore Outdoor Center. Some examples of projects started last year are Bee Campus USA certification, Re-Use Store formation, and dorm Everyday Action Reminders. All members will be encouraged to take leadership in ways that will help them grow into their full potential.

 

Earth Day

Earth Day at ISU began in 2009 as a speaker series in the Biology department and has expanded each year to encompass more aspects of sustainability. Today, Earth Day is a day-long celebration open to both campus and the community. Typically Earth Day includes outdoor games, live entertainment, more than 50 local businesses and organizations offering educational activities about sustainability, an outdoor picnic catered by Sodexo, and an evening activity. However, just like the field of sustainability, Earth Day evolves year to year. If you have any great ideas for Earth Day or would like to sit on the planning committee, please email Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu.

Taboo Topics

Taboo Topics is a speaker series designed to create a space for students to discuss topics that are considered taboo in the current zeitgeist. The Office of Sustainability, The Office of Multicultural Programs and Services, and the Department of Multidisciplinary Studies teams up each year to bring in an array of presenters who lead discussions on topics like: human rights and climate change, living with a disability, sexual assault, and more. Below are the topics lined up for the 18/19 Taboo Topics Speaker Series.

9/12 (voter suppression with voter registry)

10/10 (Screening Forbidden: Undocumented and Queer in Rural America)

11/14 (Immigration)

2/13 (post traumatic slave syndrome, key note speaker for black history month)

3/13 (mental health, speaker at Human rights Day)

4/10 (environmental Racism)

Our Green Valley Alliance

Our Green Valley Alliance for Sustainability was formed in 2009 to focus attention on ecological issues in the Wabash Valley. The Alliance hopes to expand awareness of the many positive things that are already happening here and to develop further activities. The group has transformed a bit over the years – currently the group meets quarterly to discuss ongoing sustainability efforts so that we can group member can work together to support sustainability in the Wabash Valley. If you are interested in joining the group, please contact Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu.

Eco-Reps

Eco-reps is a living experience designed to give students from any major real-world experience promoting environmental responsibility, economic vitality, and social equity on the campus and in the surrounding community.  Eco-reps will move to campus a week early and engage in a fun-filled, outdoor sustainability retreat aimed at building friendships while learning about the sustainability.  During the first semester Stewards will participate in an exciting course that covers content on sustainability and an opportunity to develop a real world project to promote sustainable behaviors, giving students the academic foundation they need to make a significant impact. The second semester will be focused on implementing the projects Eco-Reps designed in the fall.  Outstanding Eco-reps will have the opportunity to take on an internship or possible employment in the Office of Sustainability in their second year at ISU. Through being part of this living learning community, Eco-reps will develop the skills to make a meaningful impact on campus and beyond and will take those tools into their professional careers.  

The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE)

ISU is a member of AASHE, giving our community access to valuable resources. AASHE coordinates the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Ratings System (STARS) an invaluable benchmarking resource that allows ISU to track sustainability progress and compare successes to the 375 STARS rated institutions around the country. Check out our progress with STARS here. In addition to STARS AASHE offers other resources like webinars, a campus sustainability hub, and yearly conference. If you would like access to any of this great content, contact Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu.

Resources

Post Landfill Action Network (PLAN)

PLAN is an organization that empowers students to led their campuses to zero-waste. PLAN is a resource our student groups regularly use, but anyone on campus is more than welcome to all the amazing content they offer. Contact Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu for more information.

Sustainability Library

The Office of Sustainability maintains a small library of sustainability and gardening books. Check ouot what we have to offer here. If you would like to check out a book contact Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu

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Built Environment

As of 2013 all new construction on ISU’s campus will be built to at least LEED Silver standards

Federal Hall

The former Terre Haute Federal Building, constructed in 1933 and on the National Register of Historic Places, was renovated and opened as the Scott College of Business in the fall of 2012. At the corner of 7th and Cherry Streets, it serves as an entry point to campus from downtown Terre Haute. The building's renovation achieved a LEED Silver certification.

Reeve Hall

Reeve Hall is the first new residential building ISU has added to its campus in more than 40 years. The building is designed to achieve a LEED Silver certification and, when complete, will include equipment for remote metering of the building’s energy consumption.

Normal Hall

Renovations to LEED standards are currently underway for Normal Hall, the oldest building on ISU’s campus.

Green Roof

if you’ve ever enjoyed lunch in Tirey Plaza behind Rankin Hall, you may not have realized that you were eating on a rooftop! The area covers ISU’s Office of Information Technology. This is a “green roof”. In green roofs, vegetation is planted over a waterproof membrane, providing away to absorb rainwater, insulate a building, create a habitat for wildlife, and combat urban heat island effect. This means that less rainwater flows into our sewers, creating combined sewage overflows (CSOs) and flushing septic waste into the streets. It also means that, instead of radiating large quantities of heat on hot days as typical building roofs do, its vegetated surface reduces the amount of heat radiated and contributes to a lower campus temperature on especially warm days.

 

Food

ISU’s Dining Services provider, Sodexo, has made strong commitments to environmental sustainability. Sodexo’s 14 commitments are:

  • Reducing water use intensity
  • Providing and promoting varied and balanced food options
  • Reducing carbon intensity
  • Supporting local community development
  • Sourcing and promoting sustainable equipment and supplies
  • Promoting choices with reduced sugar, fat, and salts
  • Developing and promoting health and wellness solutions
  • Fighting hunger
  • Sourcing local, seasonal, and sustainably grown foods
  • Purchasing products from fair and responsibly certified sources
  • Purchasing sustainably harvested seafood
  • Complying with a Global Sustainable Supply Chain Code of Conduct
  • Reducing organic wastes
  • Reducing non-organic wastes

Sodexo recycles all cardboard, cans, and grease. Our campus food services participate in all University initiatives in regards to energy conservation, and together with Facilities Management, Resident Dining gathers food waste for compost.

Roughly 10% of Sodexo’ purchases are from local and organic sources.

Energy

Reducing Emissions

In 2001, ISU switched from a coal powered steam plant on campus to a central steam heating plant fired by natural gas boilers, which has reduced our emissions by approximately 1.8 million pounds of greenhouse gases annually.

Reducing Usage           

As a part of our Climate Action Plan, ISU has made a commitment to reach carbon neutrality by 2050. One of the largest components of reaching this goal is reducing our use of electricity on campus. Electricity accounted for 61% of ISU’s 2009 carbon emissions.

ISU has converted our lighting from incandescent bulbs to compact florescent, which has reduced our electricity consumption by one third.  We have partnered with the EPA Green Lights program to install energy efficient lighting and controls. We also worked with Duke Energy’s Indiana Demand Side Management (DSM) Core Programs, which provided rebates for upgrading existing facilities to energy efficient equipment. Though this program, we installed a variable-air-volume HVAC system for the Cunningham Memorial Library.

Light switch plate covers have been installed throughout campus to remind everybody to take responsibility for energy conservation.

Starting in fall 2018, every room in ISU Residence Halls will have marketing on the interior of the door, reminding students to turn their lights off and switch of their energy bandits.

 

Grounds

ISU has been increasing the green space and creating a buffer around campus through the installation of small tree farms. ISU currently has 18 tree farms that are maintained around campus. ISU is favoring native trees that include many oak species, service berry, white pine, American holly, black walnut, black cherry, maple, elm, sweet gum, shag bark hickory, bald cypress, and dogwood. 

In 2008, ISU eliminated comprehensive chemical treatment from 80% of our turf areas, spending about 1/3 less on applying organic fertilizer 2-3 times a season.  The remaining 20% being chemically treated surrounds the athletic fields. As the soil strength builds, we anticipate being able to cut back on fertilization to every second or third year in less critical areas.  Although we have increased irrigation throughout campus it is now linked to our weather station to manage water resources more effectively.   The water is also sourced from one of 10 deep wells that are recharged by dry wells and rain garden areas throughout campus.  

In December 2008, ISU became a Tree Campus USA as the first university to be certified in the state of Indiana.   We have maintained the standards for this certification for a decade now, and plan to continue, as we are strong supporters of the Arbor Day organization and want to do our part to further the practice and ideal of comprehensive urban forestry management throughout the country.

Since 2015 ISU has been certified as a Sustainably Landscape Institution by the Indiana Wildlife Federation.   We continue our commitment by planting native, limiting chemical and salt usage, and providing food crops and cover for wildlife.   We operate on the theory that what is good for wildlife is good for everyone.  

Transportation

Bike Share

ISU briefly worked with SPIN to provide a stationless bike share for the campus and community. SPIN decided to transition their business model to focus exclusively on electric scooters, canceling their bike sharing operation. SPIN donated all 130 bikes from the program to the school, these bikes are currently being fixed up for donation. The SPIN bike share was very successful for the University, accumulating over 10,000 rides in just under four months. The Office of Sustainability is actively looking for a replacement for SPIN.

Bike Fix-It Stations

In December 2012, ISU's Facilities Management department installed 6 new stationary bicycle pumps around campus, as well as two new bicycle “fix-it “stations where cyclists can make repairs to bicycles with tools that are attached to the stations. You can view the locations of these stations and pumps, as well as other bicycle infrastructure on campus here.

Enterprise Car Share

In the Fall semester of 2013, ISU launched a partnership with Enterprise to provide affordable, on-demand transportation to the campus community in the form of a Car Share. Car Shares allow users to rent a vehicle for a few hours at a time, saving money when compared to renting a car for a full day or owning a car. By offering this option, we hope to reduce the total number of vehicle miles driven by our campus community by encouraging students not to own a car while on campus, all while facilitating their ability to quickly and conveniently run errands and appear at job interviews. We also hope that this option makes transportation more affordable for students. Also under the Car Share program, students under the age of 25 are able to rent vehicles without incurring young driver fees. International students with a valid driver's license from any country are also eligible, but should be advised that driving with an international license after 6 months of being in the U.S. may be in violation of local laws.

Students can join the program for an annual membership fee of $35, which counts toward their driving credits. Car rentals are $7.50 per hour, which includes the cost of gasoline and insurance. Click here to explore this program and sign up!

Free Bus Rides

ISU students, faculty, and staff receive free fare on the Terre Haute City Bus. The bus provides connectivity across the City of Terre Haute. To view bus schedules, please visit the Terre Haute City Bus website.

Multi-Modal Parking Garage

This multi-modal parking garage at the corner of 8th and Cherry Streets was built on top of a brownfield site and purchased by ISU. The garage offers 623 parking spaces for cars and bicycle parking on the ground floor. It also serves as the hub for the Terre Haute City Bus and links to Greyhound buses. This structure also reduced the need for surface parking spaces on campus, which helps to decrease storm water runoff and combined sewage overflow (CSO) events that dump raw sewage into the Wabash River

Curricula

Indiana State University has been offering a Sustainability minor since 2014. In the 2017/18 academic year there were 28 Sustainability minors. These students will have a unique skill set heading into the workforce - an Arizona State University study found that 65% of small business employers and 87% of large business employers look favorably on sustainability training when making hiring decisions. Sustainability not only encompasses a multidisciplinary perspective to solve problems from local to global scales, but also teaches the critical and systemic thinking skills that apply to myriad fields of study.

Residence Halls

Individually every Sycamore can make an impact. Little acts can make a huge difference, practicing sustainable living during your time at State will prepare you to live sustainably once you leave us. Below is a high level list of ways to become a Sustainable Sycamore:

  • Turn off your lights when you leave your room, duh.
  • Unplug all Energy bandits!!! (see below)
  • Turn off the bathroom light when you leave (if no one else is there!)
  • Carry a reusable water bottle and coffee mug so you never have to use disposable drinkware. Over 1.5 million barrels of oil are used to manufacture a year's supply of bottled water in the U.S.
  • Use a hand dryers when available, if you must us paper towels, shake your hands off over the sink and only use one towel square to drive off.
  • Turn off the water while brushing your teeth.
  • Re-use old notebooks and school supplies, if you must purchase new items prioritized recycled content products.
  • Donate any usable items to a local thrift shop and try and purchase as much as you can used.
  • If you have a desktop, turn it completely off at night.
  • Use compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs in personal lighting rather than incandescent bulbs. You will save a ¼ of the energy and CFL’s last 10 times longer.
  • For every minute you shower, 12 gallons of water is used, try and keep shower times down to 4-6 minutes.

Energy Bandits

Energy Bandits are any device that uses energy while plugged in but not in use. Yes, you read that correctly, some electronic devices use energy even if they are off or on standby mode if they are plugged in! About a quarter of all residential electricity usage is from Energy Bandits. The easiest way to prevent Energy Bandits from stealing electricity is to plug all devices into a power strip, turn the power strip off when you leave your room. Some items like mini-fridges obviously need to be kept plugged in and turned on at all times.

A Few Things to Live By

Think before you buy, one of the biggest toll on the environment is over consumption. The less you buy, the more sustainable you are. If you need to purchase something – prioritize used items and sustainably sourced items.

If you think your actions don’t make a difference, you are wrong. Every Sycamore can make a difference, and together we can leave the world better than we found it.

Those who are impacted by the negative effects of climate changes are generally the poorest and most marginalized groups. These people have contributed the least to anthropogenic climate change and have the fewest resources to adapt. By living sustainably, you are saving the lives of the less fortunate.

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Recycle Center

The Indiana State University Recycle Center opened in May of 1990. It started as a University endeavor to reduce landfill costs and to make a positive influence on our environment. Our Center has turned into a community recycling center and an educational center to promote sustainability and recycling throughout the University, the City of Terre Haute, Vigo County, surrounding communities, and the State of Indiana. We offer tours of our facility to share our success and inspire others to recycle. Check out the Recycle Center website for many more details.

Lead Testing

Is your backyard a dangerous place? Many homes in Terre Haute were painted while lead-based paints were common, and gasolines containing lead seeped into the ground. While lead is no longer used in paints or gasoline, several area properties test positive for high concentrations of lead and other harmful heavy metals. Lead exposure impairs cognition and nutrient intake and is particularly dangerous to children, whose bodies are still developing and are not as resilient as those of adults. ISU offers free lead testing to anyone in the Terre Haute area. The procedure takes seconds and does not alter your yard. To have your property tested, contact ISU-Lead@mail.indstate.edu. Testing conducted to date is estimated at a $48,000 value to the Terre Haute community.

Permaculture

The Office of Sustainability is currently working on a project to expand the Community Garden past 12th street to create a Permaculture Food Forest. When complete in three years, the Food Forest will offer a self-sustainability source of food in a food desert. If you would like more information on this project, contact Nicholas.mccreary@indstate.edu

Aquaponics/Greenhouse

In the spring of 2013, ICS was awarded funding through the Lilly Endowment for the construction of 7 "sister" greenhouses to be located in the Wabash Valley and facilitate intergenerational learning about science, nutrition, and local food systems. The seven greenhouses are at the following locations (mapped above): • Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College's White Violet Center for Eco-Justice • Ivy Tech Community College's Giving Garden • Indiana State University's Institute for Community Sustainability • Indiana State University's Early Childhood Education Center • Catholic Charities' 14th and Chestnut Community Center • Rose Hulman Institute of Technology • Lost Creek Township In 2018, an environmental science class created an aquaponics system within the greenhouse. This is the second aquaponics system on campus. In the future the system will be used to grow food year-round.

Solarize

The Office of Sustainability leads the Solarize Terre Haute Project. Solarize Terre Haute is the local Solarize Indiana chapter. Many people like the idea of having solar panels on their homes but feel daunted by their lack of knowledge about solar or worry that solar may not be a sound investment. Others can’t make the time to find a reputable solar contractor or fear that they’ll receive a poor price or product. Still others may not see going solar as something that regular folks do. This Solarize initiative driven by passionate volunteers across the state is engaging a large number of homeowners and businesses to go solar, conveniently providing them with just the information they need, recruiting and selecting a contractor, and ensuring quality equipment and a good price. Last year’s efforts led to a 20% increase in solar homes in Indiana.

Green Guides

The Office of Sustainability is currently working on a few Community Green Guides. More information coming soon!

Community Garden

Growing a sense of community while helping fight hunger.

For the past ten years, Indiana State has provided land for expert and novice gardeners to plant garden plots free of charge. In return, gardeners promise to tend to their plots, plant only annuals, and refrain from using pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Participants are encouraged to donate a portion of the produce raised to the food pantry of their choice.

Information

Location: 219 N 11th Street
Growing season: April - October
Cost: We ask every gardener to donate a portion of their produce to the food pantry of their choice.

  • Available plot sizes: 10x10 feet, 10x15 feet, or 20x20 feet
  • Tools and garden hose will be available during scheduled hours each week.
  • The community garden is pesticide, herbicide, insecticide, and fungicides free.
  • Expert consultation will be available through volunteers.

Registration

Registration information for the upcoming gardening season is usually posted in February.

Garden Policies 

 

 

Info/Mission

For the past ten years, Indiana State has provided land for expert and novice gardeners to plant garden plots free of charge. In return, gardeners promise to tend to their plots, plant only annuals, and refrain from using pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Participants are encouraged to donate a portion of the produce raised to the food pantry of their choice.

Information

Location: 219 N 11th Street
Growing season: April - October
Cost: We ask every gardener to donate a portion of their produce to the food pantry of their choice.

  • Available plot sizes: 10x10 feet, 10x15 feet, or 20x20 feet
  • Tools and garden hose will be available during scheduled hours each week.
  • The community garden is pesticide, herbicide, insecticide, and fungicides free.
  • Expert consultation will be available through volunteers.

History

Since 2008, the garden was 50 plots on 2 city lots. ISU added a garden shed and stocked it with garden tools and hoses.  A well was dug and water lines lay with water spigots throughout the garden.  There was a house on the original property and it became the garden house used for shelter, bathroom facilities and winter storage.  Approximately 45 to 50 folks signed up for a plot that year.  It garden mission was to make gardening available to local residents with no fees, with the premise of gardening 100% organic and to donate a iminium of 10% of the harvested produce.

Over the years, additional lots were purchased and added to the growing garden.  By 2012 the garden was one city block big with over 100 plots and approximately 80 gardeners.  The Institute for Community Sustainability (ICS) needed a home and choose the garden house to make into their office.  They modernized the building, added a deck and created a space that keeps with the idea of sustainability.  The Institute for Community Sustainability Garden House provides a meeting a room, bathroom facilities and a library of gardening-related books and leaflets for the gardeners.  ICS is a visible symbol of commitment to sound environmental practices.

In fall of 2012 a group of ISU students conducted a lead study.  It was discovered that 30 feet from the streets there was a high elevation of lead and these area would need to be removed from production.  The gardeners in these spaces would need to be moved to safer ground. About 20 plots were placed into other types of production and usage.

2013 the garden expanded into the next city block on the east side of the alley.  With the loss of about 20 plots from the lead study and with the addition of waterlines and 80 plots, the garden grew to 160 plots and about 100 gardeners and families. There was created multiple beds for perennial gardening, varies berry raised beds and a greenhouse.  The greenhouse was opened in spring 2015, allowing for early cultivation of seeds.

In 2016 an orchard was created from grant funding.  Six apple trees and two plum trees were planted.  A 40 foot by 30 foot Asparagus bed as planted with 40 plants. Various berry plantings and rhubarb added to raised beds and the strawberry bed was moved to a larger area.

History

Since 2008, the garden was 50 plots on 2 city lots. ISU added a garden shed and stocked it with garden tools and hoses.  A well was dug and water lines lay with water spigots throughout the garden.  There was a house on the original property and it became the garden house used for shelter, bathroom facilities and winter storage.  Approximately 45 to 50 folks signed up for a plot that year.  It garden mission was to make gardening available to local residents with no fees, with the premise of gardening 100% organic and to donate a iminium of 10% of the harvested produce.

Over the years, additional lots were purchased and added to the growing garden.  By 2012 the garden was one city block big with over 100 plots and approximately 80 gardeners.  The Institute for Community Sustainability (ICS) needed a home and choose the garden house to make into their office.  They modernized the building, added a deck and created a space that keeps with the idea of sustainability.  The Institute for Community Sustainability Garden House provides a meeting a room, bathroom facilities and a library of gardening-related books and leaflets for the gardeners.  ICS is a visible symbol of commitment to sound environmental practices.

In fall of 2012 a group of ISU students conducted a lead study.  It was discovered that 30 feet from the streets there was a high elevation of lead and these area would need to be removed from production.  The gardeners in these spaces would need to be moved to safer ground. About 20 plots were placed into other types of production and usage.

2013 the garden expanded into the next city block on the east side of the alley.  With the loss of about 20 plots from the lead study and with the addition of waterlines and 80 plots, the garden grew to 160 plots and about 100 gardeners and families. There was created multiple beds for perennial gardening, varies berry raised beds and a greenhouse.  The greenhouse was opened in spring 2015, allowing for early cultivation of seeds.

In 2016 an orchard was created from grant funding.  Six apple trees and two plum trees were planted.  A 40 foot by 30 foot Asparagus bed as planted with 40 plants. Various berry plantings and rhubarb added to raised beds and the strawberry bed was moved to a larger area.

Donations

All gardeners are required to donate 10% of their produce. Donations can be left in the bins on the back porch Monday-Friday, these bins will be picked up daily by Infinity House. Gardeners must weigh and record their donations with the scale and donation log which will be located near the donation bins. If you would like to donate to another charity or individual that is perfectly fine. Gardeners who choose to do this must report to the garden staff where they will be donating. These gardeners are still required to weigh and record their donations.

Garden Sheds Shift Calendar

We will insert the same calendar here as there currently is on the garden page.

Reduce Scope 1 & 2 Emission While Improving/Maintaining Sustainability Tracking and Benchmarking

Commitment:

Explore the expansion of alternative energy and energy efficiency projects on campus

Manage

Yearly

Commitment:

Maintain and improve STARS reporting

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve ACUPCC reporting

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Develop a plan to sub-meter buildings across campus

New

19

Commitment:

Centralize sustainability achievements and marketing

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a plan to transition Facilities Management vehicles to fuel efficient vehicles

New

19

Commitment:

Update and improve the Energy Star appliance policy

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a no-idle policy for Facilities Management vehicles on campus

New

20

Commitment:

Develop an energy reduction competition between non-residential buildings competition

New

20

Commitment:

Develop a residence hall energy reduction competition

New

20

Commitment:

Update our contract with Enterprise to require hybrid vehicles in our car share

New

21

 

Reduce Solid Waste Per Capita

Commitment:

Assist Residential Life with maintaining and improving the residence hall move out program

Manage

Yearly

Commitment:

Apply for grants to improve waste diversion infrastructure on campus

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Develop a zero-waste event guide

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a plan for Meatless Mondays

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a plan to decrease waste at athletic events

New

19

Commitment:

Develop and facilitate waste competitions on campus

New

19

Commitment:

Transition water fountains to water bottle filling stations

New

20

Commitment:

Develop  and maintain an on-campus thrift shop

New

20

Commitment:

Develop and encourage the use of a sustainable procurement policy

New

20

Commitment:

Work with multiple organizations and departments to provide every first year student with a re-useable water bottle

New

21

Commitment:

Ban the sale of plastic disposable water bottles on campus

New

22

Improve Campus Engagement in Sustainability Efforts

Commitment:

Improve OS marketing and branding

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve Earth Day

Manage

Yearly

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the OS Website

New

18

Commitment:

Develop a Green Greek program

New

18

Commitment:

Develop a green wall for Lincoln Dining Hall

New

18

Commitment:

Rename ICS and redesign the OS logo

New

18

Commitment:

Establish a campus advisory council

New

19

Commitment:

Develop an eco-rep/professional development program

New

19

Commitment:

Develop an on-campus green living guide for students

New

19

Commitment:

Add sustainability into new student transition programming

New

19

Commitment:

Infuse sustainability into current campus tours

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a Green Office Certification Program

New

20

Commitment:

Adopt the Leave No Trace Program for forested properties

New

20

Commitment:

Increase local/healthier meal options in The Commons

New

20

Improve Community Engagement in Sustainability Efforts

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the Community Garden

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the relationship with CCE

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Develop a permaculture food forest at the Community Garden

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve cooking classes

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Develop a Community Garden Advisory Council

New

18

Commitment:

Establish a Community Advisory Council

New

18

Commitment:

Develop an aquaponics system at the Community Garden

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a community green guide

New

19

Commitment:

Become Bee Campus certified

New

19

Commitment:

Develop and maintain a sustainability focused alumni network

New

20

Commitment:

Develop and maintain sustainable landscape workshops for community members

New

20

Commitment:

Develop and maintain a community e-waste recycling drive

New

20

Improve access to Alternative transportation

Commitment:

Develop and maintain a bikeshare program

New

19

Commitment:

Develop a bike services master plan

New

19

Commitment:

Designate priority parking spots for fuel-efficient vehicles

New

20

Commitment:

Develop a plan to improve carpooling rates

New

20

Commitment:

Improve public/alternative transportation education through classes and marketing

New

20

Infuse Sustainability Across the Curriculum

Commitment:

Maintain and expand the sustainability minor

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the sustainability research guide

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Increase the number of research opportunities through OS.

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the Sustainability Fellows program

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Include Sustainability in the Curricular Engagement Inventory

New

19

Commitment:

Develop an undergraduate and graduate sustainability major

New

19

Commitment:

Create an Introduction to Sustainability course

Manage

20

Commitment:

Develop a sustainability workshop for faculty

New

21

Commitment:

Assess the sustainability literacy of incoming and outgoing students

New

22

Integrate Sustainability into Equity Initiatives

Commitment:

Use a social justice ethic to drive sustainability across campus

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Maintain and improve the Taboo Topics speaker series

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Increase the number of students from underrepresented groups leading sustainability projects

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Act as a strong ally for departments, offices, and organizations that
empower systematically oppressed groups

Manage

Ongoing

Commitment:

Recommend that verbiage regarding non-discrimination policy is carried throughout university departments and student organizations

New

19

Commitment:

Ensure that all classes that are labeled as being "sustainability" courses include the three pillars of sustainability (environmental, economic, social)

New

19

Commitment:

Offer an environmental justice course

New

20