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FALL 2021 CLASSES

Department of History

100 Level | 200 Level | 300-400 Level | AFRI | 500-600 Level

Undergraduate Courses (HIST)

The planned teaching modality is noted for each section.

HIST 101 – Studies in World Civilization to 1500
3 credits

Instructor:
Dr. Barbara Skinner

Description
Studies in selected world civilizations from the beginnings to the early modern age. Those themes which have a direct bearing upon contemporary culture and society will be stressed.

Foundational Studies Credit
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity

Meets: TR 11:00-12:15 and 12:30-1:45

HIST 102 – Studies in World Civilization since 1500
3 credits

Instructors:
Dr. James Gustafson

Description
Studies in world history dealing with the modern era and contemporary world problems.

Foundational Studies Credit
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity

Meets: TR 9:30-10:45

HIST 200 – How Historians Ask and Answer Questions
3 credits

Instructor:
Dr. Isaac Land

Description
This course introduces current and prospective History majors and minors to how historians analyze the past. The course thus explores the different ways in which historians have asked questions about the past (methodology) and how these questions have evolved over time (historiography). Students in the course will learn to interpret primary documents, grapple with how historians construct arguments, and engage in the basics of historical research. 

Foundational Studies Credit
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity

Meets: MWF 11:00-11:50

HIST 213 – Topics in History
3 credits
Topics vary by instructor

Dr. Ruth Fairbanks
Dr. Daniel Clark
Dr. Taylor Easum
Ms. Michelle Morahn
Dr. Jessica Fields
Dr. Timothy Hawkins
Dr. Lisa Phillips
Dr. James Gustafson
Dr. Kimberly Stanley
Dr. Donald Maxwell

Description
Topics in History helps students explore the discipline of history through focused study of particular topics. Each section provides students with an introduction to reading, writing, and research in history, as well as to the ways in which study of the past helps in better understanding society today. Students learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, make and assess persuasive arguments, and understand multiple causation and the importance of context, continuity, and change over time. History majors may count this course for credit in the major.

Prerequisites
Completion of ENG 105, ENG 107, or ENG 108

Foundational Studies Credit
Historical Perspectives

Topics and Meeting Times:

African American Women’s HistoryAfrican American
Instructor: Dr. Kimberly Stanley
Meets: TR 11:000am-12:15pm & Online Synchronous
Description:

This course will examine the experience of African American Women in United States history. It is designed with the idea that there is not one singular experience of black women and that black women were foundational in the building of the United States. This course will take a chronological and thematic approach in the study of African American Women’s history.

Making Modern AmericaMaking Modern America
Instructor: Dr. Daniel Clark
Meets: MWF 9:00-9:50
Description:

This class will examine US history from Reconstruction through the 1960’s. It will emphasize the theme “how did we get here?” By looking at past as prologue, students will come away with appreciation for past events’ impact on shaping our modern world view. Topics such as race relations, culture, and politics will be featured, but special emphasis will be placed on working class history, which is often ignored in High School classes. This is an overview of the period, with the hope students will engage the material further through upper level classes which go into more depth on one topic, or simply through their own investigation. It is painless history, which asks students not to just memorize dates and facts, but to synthesize the material, thus developing their critical thinking skills.

Indiana Historyindiana
Instructor: Ms. Michelle Morahn
Meets: MWF 11:00-11:50
Description:

This course will cover the history of the State of Indiana from pre-settlement to the 1970’s. It will feature themes of economic, social, and political history, with special attention to the local history of the Wabash Valley and surrounding areas. It is intended to be a broad overview of the period. Rather than requiring rote memorization of facts and dates, this course will emphasize a variety of readings, discussions, and developmental writing assignments to help students develop a deeper personal connection with the state’s history.

The PlagueBlackDeath
Instructor: Dr. Jessica Fields
Meets: MWF 11:00-11:50 am & 12:00pm-12:50pm & 2:00-2:50
Description:

The Black Death wrought havoc across Europe and Asia in the 14th Century, and remained endemic in many places for centuries to come. Within three years of its arrival, at least one-third of Europe’s population had succumbed to the horrific disease. This led to massive social, religious, and political upheaval that would be felt for the rest of the Middle Ages and well beyond. This class will study those impacts through a historical consideration of primary source materials, and will also highlight anthropological and epidemiological perspectives through the latest scientific literature.

Modern Iran and Central Asia
Instructor: Dr. James Gustafson
Meets: TR 11:00-12:15 & 12:30-1:45
Description:

This course is an introduction to the social and cultural history of Iran, Central Asia, and the broader Persian speaking world. Students will engage with primary sources and the works of prominent historians of this region, while placing Persianate history into the broader scope of modern world history. Students will learn to think historically in this class, with an emphasis on critical and contextual reading, seeing our perspectives on the past as reflections of the present, and viewing isolated historical events as parts of long term social and cultural developments.

Immigrant America
Instructor: Dr. Ruth Fairbanks
Meets: MWF 9:00-9:50 & 10:00-10:50
Description:

The Statue of Liberty, symbolically linked to immigration, is one of the most cherished and recognized American images at home and abroad.  Many Americans eagerly nurture ties to ancestral lands. Yet anti-immigrant rhetoric abounds now and in the past. The story of Immigrant America is full of such contradictions and puzzles. This course will cover push and pull factors, forced migration, return migration, ethnic group identities, Americanization, refugee policies, anti-immigrant attitudes, and related issues. We will explore a variety of approaches to the study of Immigrant America, and we will analyze primary documents produced by Americans and by new arrivals. We will also examine how the institutions, structures and attitudes formed by America’s immigrant past shape the conditions for immigrants today and American conversations about them.

China and the WorldChina and the World.jpg
Instructor: Dr. Taylor Easum
Meets: MWF 10:00-10:50 & 11:00-11:50 & 12:00-12:50
Description:

China is in the news a lot these days. This course will introduce students to the historical context behind current Chinese policies, such as claims to islands in the South China Sea, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), suppression of democratic protests in Hong Kong, internment of Uyghurs in Xinjiang. How does history inform Chinese policy today, and how does it shape America's understanding of China’s global ambitions? How does China’s relationship with Southeast Asia in the past shape its political ambitions in the region today? What are the historical experiences of Africans in China, and Chinese in Africa? Together, we will learn about Chinese history, and how an understanding of the past can help us make sense of the present.

How the U.S. Got Its ShapeUS Got its Shape
Instructor: Dr. Donald Maxwell
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15 & Online Asynchronous
Description:

As the United States expanded from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from the Rio Grande to the 49th parallel, it encountered other nations—Native American and European—with claims on North American land. The map of the continental United States was complete as of 1854, but has not completely represented U.S. territory since 1857. By 1945 the United States had acquired and occupied vast amounts of territory around the world, but by 1960 it had contracted back to 50 states, some territories and military bases. Through historic documents and recent writing by historians, we can see that the geography of the United States was never accidental and has always been controversial.

Atlantic RevolutionsAtlantic Revolutions.png
Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hawkins
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45 & 2:00-3:15
Description:

Between 1775 and 1825, revolutionary discontent with the traditional order convulsed the societies of the Atlantic World. Inspired by radical political, economic, social, and cultural ideas promoted by Enlightenment thinkers, English colonists in North America broke from Great Britain in 1775 and established the first independent nation in the Western hemisphere. Shortly thereafter, the revolutionary spark exploded in France, upending its monarchy and plunging Europe into two decades of war. Encouraged by these events, slaves in the French Caribbean colony of St. Domingue then launched their own movement for emancipation that resulted in the creation of an independent Haiti. Finally, these revolutionary ideals took root in the Spanish and Portuguese colonies of the Americas. The civil wars that shook the region during the 1810s culminated in the establishment of independent republics across Latin America by 1825. By focusing on the connections between these movements, HIST 213: Atlantic Revolutions will draw a unified picture of the violent and drawn-out process that began the dismantling of traditional western society and set the stage for modern understandings of politics, nationalism, economics, culture, gender, race, and class.

History through DisneyHistory through Disney
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Phillips
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45 & 12:30-1:45
Description:

“History through Disney” is designed to encourage students think about “big” topics in history through the lens of our beloved “Disney,” both Walt, the man who started the Disney empire of course, and the Disney Studios and Corporation. Populism, The Age of Invention, Business Growth and Monopoly, Labor Unions and Labor Controversy, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Rise of American Conservatism, Gender Roles and the Nuclear Family, American Imperialism: Disney was and is at the center of them all. Some argue that Disney has, for most of the twentieth and now into the 21st century, provided the very cultural framework through which we understand everything from sports, to gender, race, ideas about what constitutes “entertainment,” work, even our understanding of history. Throughout the semester, we will examine the extent to which this is the case and, if so, how it happened!

HIST 313 – Topics in History
3 credits
Topics vary by instructor

Dr. Anne Foster
Mr. Eric Petenbrink
Dr. Kimberly Stanley
Dr. Ann Chirhart

General Description:
“Topics in History” allows students to explore the discipline of history through focused study of a particular topic. Students learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, make and assess persuasive arguments, and understand multiple causation and the importance of context, continuity, and change over time. History majors may not count this course for credit in the major.
Foundational Studies Credit:
Historical Perspectives
Topics and Meeting Times:

The Long War on DrugsWar on Drugs.jpg
Instructor: Dr. Anne Foster
Meets: MW 2:00-3:15
Description:

Until the early 20th century, federal laws in the United States were silent on the topic of drugs, except in taxing them when they were imports. At the end of the 19th century, a prohibitionist movement gained steam, and increasingly strict regulations were passed at the federal level, culminating in the 1914 prohibition of narcotics, 1919 (only until 1933) prohibition of alcohol, and 1937 prohibition of marijuana. In this course, we explore how the United States came to adopt a prohibitionist approach to narcotics and marijuana, and other forms of restriction for alcohol (and later tobacco). We also explore the social, economic, political and legal consequences of this approach to drug regulation. U.S. drugs policy developed in both domestic and international contexts, so we also explore the different layers of influence on U.S. policy. By the end of this course, we will have examined (1) the origins of 20th and 21st century U.S. drugs policy (2) the interactions of personal consumption practice with governmental policy (3) the reasons for and consequences of the “War on Drugs” approach to drugs control (4) the aspects of U.S. drugs policy which have remained relatively constant since the early 20th century and (5) the aspects of U.S. drugs policy which have changed since the early 20th century.

 

The Civil Rights Movementcivil rights.jpg
Instructor:
Mr. Eric Petenbrink
Online Asynchronous
Description:
The African American civil rights struggle was one of the most influential historical moments of the 20th century, fundamentally altering the democratic tradition, addressing deep racial injustices, and paving the way for numerous protest movements that further expanded the reach of equal rights in America. This course explores the complex history of the post-World War II black freedom struggle, the various activists who participated in a range of political and protest efforts, and the profound reforms that resulted from their hard work and sacrifice. Focusing on a combination of well-known leaders – like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X – as well as average African American citizens in both the north and south, this class examines civil rights activism in the broadest sense, including different philosophies about black advancement, the benefits and shortcomings of integrated institutions, and the goals of the movement beyond ending Jim Crow segregation in the south. By the end of the semester, students will have a better sense of the evolution of African American politics, the growth and expansion of the protest tradition in American democracy, the changing nature of African American identity in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, and the profound impact the movement had on the race relations of our present-day society.

The Gay and Lesbian Rights MovementThe Gay and Lesbian Rights Movement
Instructor:
Mr. Eric Petenbrink
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Description:
The struggle for LGBT rights has been one of the most important social transformations of the past 20 years. To understand how this vital political movement has affected modern public attitudes and policies in such a brief period of time, this class examines the history of the gay and lesbian rights movement from the end of World War II to the present day. The gay and lesbian rights movement allows us to explore the emergence of new perspectives on human sexuality, the rise of modern sexual and gender identities, and the use of classic social protest methods to push for fundamental reforms to the civil rights of the LGBT community. This course covers the period from the earliest gay and lesbian activists of the 1950s to the Stonewall Riots and Gay Liberation in the 1960s and 1970s, and from the AIDS crisis of the 1980s to the present day struggles for same-sex marriage and legal protections against discrimination in order to demonstrate the profound political, social, and cultural changes that the LGBT rights movement has made on contemporary American society.

American EnvironmentalismAmerican Environmentalism.jpg
Instructor:
Mr. Eric Petenbrink
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Description:
Many scientists and social commentators argue that the greatest threat facing the world today is the rapidly changing nature of our climate and the effect of these environmental shifts on human society. Yet while these concerns have become more pressing in the last few decades, American environmentalism is hardly new, with deep roots in U.S. history stretching back to the colonial era. This course examines the long history of conservation and environmentalism in the United States, from the early naturalists and Romantics to the contemporary fight against climate change. We’ll examine the emergence of important environmental protections like the National Park Service, educational activities like the formation of Earth Day, and dramatic protests like the Standing Rock Sioux’s efforts to divert oil pipelines from their tribal lands. Along the way, we’ll gain a better understanding of the methods and goals of environmentalists during different points in American history, as well as the divisions and conflicts among these activists. And finally, we’ll be able to better appreciate our own historical and environmental moment and how it fits into much longer debates about the balance between modern society and environmental preservation.

The Constitution and Equality
Instructor:
Dr. Ann Chirhart
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Description:
In the Declaration of Independence written in 1776, the cosigners agreed “that all men are created equal,” a concept that was reiterated in the Constitution of the United States. Yet in 1787, the states also preserved slavery, solidified the right to vote for male property owners only, and continued a brutal conquest of Native American nations. In this course, we will discuss the framework of the government created in the U.S. Constitution and explore the long, tumultuous battle for equality throughout our history that including the Civil War and numerous fights for suffrage. Focusing on the Constitution, we will read numerous documents and historians’ writings about the ways in which this document shaped the United States.

 

HIST 336 – 1960’s: Counterculture & Protest
3 credits
Area A

Instructor: Dr. Richard Schneirov
Meets: TR 11:00-12:15
Foundational Studies Credit: Upper Division Integrative Elective
Description:
Investigation of the counterculture and social and political protest movements in the United States from 1955-1975.

HIST 345 – Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies
3 credits
Area C

Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hawkins
Meets: TR 12:30-1:45
Foundational Studies Credit: Upper Division Integrative Elective
Description:
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America and its diaspora which is designed to provide students with an understanding of the primary forces that have shaped the history of this complex region: the colonial experience and nation-building; economic development and dependence; social inequality and political revolution; cultural and ethnic diversity; immigration and the Latino experience; and the role the United States plays in the region.

HIST 404 – Internship in Public History
3 credits
Area Other

Instructor: Dr. Donald Maxwell
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45
Description:
Introduces the major issues and careers available in public history, including museums, archives, national parks, historic preservation, and oral history. Includes an on-site internship experience.

HIST 415 – Gilded Age & Progressive Era 1877-1917
3 credits
Area A

Instructor: Dr. Richard Schneirov
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15
Description:
In this course we will explore how a modern industrial capitalist society emerged after the Civil War and entered its crisis phase in the 1870s-90s, at which time it gave way to a corporate-administered society. At the same time, the country made a transition from agrarian democracy to a “progressive democracy.” The course will examine how these two transitions were handled economically, politically, legally, intellectually, and culturally. By 1917, when the Wilson administration turned from domestic reform to entrance into the First World War the transition to what historians call “modern America” had been largely completed. Our examination will focus on how popular movements (labor, women’s, Populist, Socialist, and especially Progressive), social organizations (corporations, trade unions, professional associations, and interest groups) and government policymaking (promotion of capital accumulation, regulation of market competition, social welfare reform, foreign policy actions, etc.) facilitated, responded to, and shaped this transformation. About one-third of the course will center on the creation during and after the Civil War of an urban industrial capitalist society and how the class and social conflicts associated with it undermined an older classical liberalism; the second third of the course examines the crisis of the 1890s and how it gave way to corporate consolidation, urban and national reform, party realignment, and imperialism; the final third of the course focuses on national politics and examines national Progressivism from 1901-1920 with emphasis on the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt.

HIST 435 – History of Thought & Culture in the US, 1860 to the Present
3 credits
Area A

Instructor: Dr. Daniel Clark
Meets: MWF 12:00-12:50
Description:
The impact of American thought of industrialization, urbanization, the scientific and technological revolutions, the major upheavals in domestic and international affairs over the past century.

HIST 447 – Contested Heritage
3 credits
Area Other

Instructor: Dr. Isaac Land
Meets: MWF 1:00-1:50
Description:
The past—the received wisdom, values, and experiences that define a society’s heritage—takes a wide array of forms. Museums and museum exhibits, debates over the nature and placement of monuments, controversies surrounding school textbooks, the role of history in the entertainment industry (including theme parks, film, historical re-enactment, and video games), and historical symbols all form part of the tapestry of public history. This course seeks to explore how these different forms of history writ large shape our collective understanding of the past by celebrating, contesting, and exploiting elements of history, playing on a sense of nostalgia, and by connecting to a sense of collective identity.

HIST 471 – Modern Russia
3 credits
Area B

Instructor: Dr. Barbara Skinner
Meets: TR 3:30-4:45
Description:
Late Russian Empire reforms and cultural, social, political response. The rise and fall of the Soviet Union: Bolshevik revolution, the Stalin era, Gorbachev, and post-Soviet challenges.

HIST 498 – Global Urban History
3 credits
Area C

Instructor: Dr. Taylor Easum
Meets: MW 2:00-3:15
Description:
In 2007 the planet crossed an important threshold that you probably didn't notice: for the first time, more people on earth lived in urban areas than in rural. As this trend continues, an understanding of urban history around the world is vital. This course will introduce students to the field and practice of global urban history—the study of the historical development of cities and towns around the world, as well as the social, cultural, and political life of (and in) cities. This course will begin with an examination of the origins of cities, and quickly move to an exploration of different forms of urbanism in Europe, Asia, Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Americas. For a final project, students will research an issue of importance to cities today using the methods of urban history.

Undergraduate Courses (AFRI)

AFRI 113 — Foundations of African and African American Studies
3 credits

Instructor: Rev. Terry Clark
Meets: MWF 10:00-10:50, 12:00-12:50, 1:00-1:50
Foundational Studies Credit: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description
An exploration of the philosophical, political, historical, and sociological components that form the basis of African and African American studies.

AFRI 212 — African American Cultural Traditions
3 credits
Instructor: Rev. Terry Clark
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45
Foundational Studies Credit:
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:
A focused and analytical examination of Black thought, ideology, and culture, as well as the institutional aspects of Black American life.

AFRI 312 – The African Diaspora
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Colleen Haas
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Foundational Studies Credit:
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:
This course traces the spread of African culture and ideas through the African Diaspora as a result of slavery and colonialism, and the ways that African traditions were re-interpreted and combined with European culture. Topics include: ideas of the Diaspora, religious beliefs, food traditions, music, and kinship traditions in the United States, Caribbean, and South America.

AFRI 329/MUS 329 – Music in Africa
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Colleen Haas
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15
Foundational Studies Credit:
Upper Division Integrative Elective
Description:
This course provides an introduction to music making in Africa. An underlying focus will be on the relation of musical structures and practices to social and cultural systems, values and institutions. The course will be organized around important themes in African music such as: music in community life, performing groups and their music, music and historical/social transformations, and the interrelations of music and dance. Students will have a chance to integrate and demonstrate their understanding of the material through the creation of a course portfolio (graded component of the course) and learning how to study, perform and portray African music in written and oral modes of presentation. Class assignments will include scholarship, reflective writing, class discussions and a culminating public presentation including educational and expressive means to inform and inspire others.

AFRI 486 – Senior Seminar
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Kimberly Stanley
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45
Description:
An in-depth study of a topic or topics determined by the instructor. This course will provide a culminating experience for students in African and African American studies, building upon previous course work in the discipline. Course work may include research projects, seminars, and service learning experiences.

AFRI 494/PSCI 488 – African Politics
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Samory Rashid
Meets: TR 3:30-4:45
Description:
An analysis of African governments and politics through the use of comparative analytical methods. Analyses will include Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, and South Africa.

 Graduate Courses

All classes are online. Each class meets synchronously for a bloc of time one evening each week.

HIST 526 – History of the South
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Ann Chirhart
Meets: Online on Wednesday evenings
Description:
To most Americans, the South was, and continues to be, a monolithic region as well as the nation’s most undemocratic region. In this course, we begin with a different assumption: the South became a battleground where democracy was sharply contested with momentous consequences for the United States and the world. This semester, we will explore many different “Souths.” Beginning with the colonial era, we will examine how southerners envisioned democracy and fought to fulfill its promises. Thus, we will consider numerous factors—race, class, gender, sexuality, and culture—and focus on how they shaped successes and failures through history.

HIST 600 – History Research Methods
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Anne Foster
Meets: Online on Monday evenings
Description:
The course focuses primarily on the skills needed to conduct historical research with some discussion of the theoretical bases for the study of history. Students will learn how to use databases, analyze historical documents, evaluate articles and monographs, and write book reviews and historiographical analysis. They will study the “history of history” by reading foundational texts in the field. Other restrictions: Must take during the first or second semester in the program.

HIST 622 – Social Movements in Historical Context
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Phillips
Meets: Online on Tuesday evenings
Description:
This course examines movements in U.S. history, broadly defined, from the antebellum through the Reagan eras. We will examine the social, political, and economic movements that have come to define specific time periods in new ways. For example, we will consider women’s suffrage movement within the context of the United States’ expansionist policies of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The abolitionist, anti-immigrant, Populist, labor, free enterprise, civil rights, Black Nationalist, antiwar, environmental, and evangelical movements will, likewise, be examined through the lenses of the latest scholarship. By the end of the semester, students will have enhanced their understanding of U.S. history from a chronological perspective (the 1840s-1980s), gained a contextual understanding of the movements themselves, and considered how historians contribute to our collective re-understanding of the past.