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FALL 2022 CLASSES

Department of History

100 Level | 200 Level | 300-400 Level | AFRI | 500-600 Level

Undergraduate Courses (HIST)

 

HIST 101 – Studies in World Civilization to 1500
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Steve Stofferahn
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15pm
Foundational Studies Credit: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:

 Studies in selected world civilizations from the beginnings to the early modern age. Those themes which have a direct bearing upon contemporay culture and society will be stressed. 

 

HIST 102 – World Civilization since 1500
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Taylor Easum
Meets: MWF 10:00-10:50am & 11:00-11:50am
Foundational Studies Credit: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description: 

Studies in world history dealing with the modern era and contemporary world problems. 

 

HIST 200– How Historians Ask and Answer Questions
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Isaac Land
Meets: MWF 11:00-11:50am
Foundational Studies Credit: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description: 

This course introduces students to how historians try to understand the past. The course thus explores the different ways in which historians have asked questions about the past (methodology) and how these questions have evolved over time (historiography). Students in the course will learn to interpret primary documents, grapple with how historians construct arguments, and engage in the basics of historical research. This course is required for students in the history major and minor, but is open to all.

 

HIST 213 – Topics in History
3 credits
Topics vary by instructor

Dr. Daniel Clark

Dr. Taylor Easum

Dr. James Gustafson

Dr. Ruth Fairbanks

Dr. Timothy Hawkins

Dr. Barbara Skinner

Dr. Donald Maxwell

             Dr. Lisa Phillips

             Dr. Jessica Fields

 

Description
Topics in History helps students explore the discipline of history through focused study of particular topics. Each section provides students with an introduction to reading, writing, and research in history, as well as to the ways in which study of the past helps in better understanding society today. Students learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, make and assess persuasive arguments, and understand multiple causation and the importance of context, continuity, and change over time. History majors may count this course for credit in the major.

Prerequisites
Completion of ENG 105, ENG 107, or ENG 108

Foundational Studies Credit
Historical Perspectives

Topics and Meeting Times:

 

The Plague

Plague
Instructor: Dr. Jessica Fields
Meets:
MWF 12:00-12:50pm
Description:

The Black Death wrought havoc across Europe and Asia in the 14th Century, and remained endemic in many places for centuries to come. Within three years of its arrival, at least one-third of Europe’s population had succumbed to the horrific disease. This led to massive social, religious, and political upheaval that would be felt for the rest of the Middle Ages and well beyond. This class will study those impacts through a historical consideration of primary source materials, and will also highlight anthropological and epidemiological perspectives through the latest scientific literature.

 

Epidemics in History

Epidemics
Instructor: Dr. Jessica Fields
Meets: MWF 2:00-2:50pm

Description:

Disease is part of the human experience. From ancient civilizations to our modern world, each society has experienced disease. Some of these diseases become epidemics, spreading at rapid, seemingly uncontrollable rates across vast geographic areas. Each would have a lasting impact, leading to social, political, and economic changes. This class will examine several of these epidemics and study the nature of the disease and its impact through a historical consideration of primary source materials, as well as highlighting anthropological and epidemiological perspectives through the latest scientific literature. 

 

Environmental History

Environmental History
Instructor: Dr. James Gustafson
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45am & 11:00am-12:15pm 
Description:

Environmental History is the study of change over time through humanity's interaction with the rest of nature. This course is designed as an introduction to the study of modern world history through an environmental lens, exploring different societies’ relationships with the natural world with an emphasis on how we reshape nature for our own purposes. We will explore the rise of systems of global exchange; the impact of climate change; disease and famine; and the management of land, water and natural resources. Although the course is global in nature, there will be a special focus on local and regional issues.      

 

How the U.S. Got Its Shape

US Shape
Instructor: Dr. Donald Maxwell
Meets: TR 11:00am-12:15pm
Description:

As the United States expanded from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and from the Rio Grande to the 49th parallel, it encountered other nations-Native American and European-that also had claims on North American land. The map of the continental United States was complete as of 1854, but had not completely represented U.S. territory since 1857. By 1945, the United States had acquired and occupied vast amounts of territory around the world, but by 1960, it had contracted back to 50 states, some territories, and dozens of military bases. Historic documents and recent writing by historians show us that the geography of the United States was never accidental and has frequently been controversial. 

 

History of Mexico

Mexico
Instructor: Dr. Timothy Hawkins
Meets: TR 9:30-10:45am & 2:00-3:15pm
Description:

This course has been designed to provide students with a means to explore the rich history of Mexico.  This approach will begin with an overview of Mexican history.  A review of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of Mesoamerica will follow.  The course will address the colonial history of New Spain and then proceed to the emergence of the Mexican nation-state in the nineteenth century.  A topic of particular attention will be the Mexican Revolution, the defining event of modern Mexico, and its aftermath.  We will end by discussing current events and borderlands issues.  While rooted in a historical perspective, the course will draw from multiple disciplines.  Above all, we will highlight major political, cultural, social, economic, nationalist, and ethnic/identity themes that have shaped the peoples of this region over the centuries.  We will approach this complex society through extensive use of primary sources with the goal of digging beneath stereotypes and understanding Mexico on its own terms.

 

Cold War

cold war
Instructor: Dr. Barbara Skinner
Meets: TR 12:30-1:45pm & 2:00-3:15pm
Description:

In the second half of the 20th century, the world divided into two opposing camps, armed for nuclear Armageddon. Centered on the two superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, this was a battle between the ideologies of Communism and democratic capitalism that affected every region of the globe. This course will consider how the bipolar division of the world affected political, cultural, technological, and social trends from the aftermath of World War II through the collapse of Communism in 1991 and its legacies in the post-Cold War world. We will not only investigate the major events such as the arms race, the building of the Berlin Wall, the “hot” and “proxy” wars in the decolonized Third World, and the Cuban Missile Crisis, but we will also discuss the impact of the Cold War in the everyday lives of people behind the “Iron Curtain,” the role of Hollywood and film in promoting the position of each side, the advanced spy-craft of the KGB and CIA, and the human cost behind the building of the powerful nuclear arsenals of the US and the USSR. We will assess the nature of superpower conflict, question and critique the political behavior behind key events, discuss the psychological and cultural responses, and ask whether we are entering a new Cold War today.        

 

Immigrant America

Immigrant
Instructor: Dr. Ruth Fairbanks
Meets: MWF 9:00-9:50am & 10:00-10:50am
Description:

The Statue of Liberty, symbolically linked to immigration, is one of the most cherished and recognized American images at home and abroad.  Many Americans eagerly nurture ties to ancestral lands. Yet anti-immigrant rhetoric abounds now and in the past. The story of Immigrant America is full of such contradictions and puzzles. This course will cover push and pull factors, forced migration, return migration, ethnic group identities, Americanization, refugee policies, anti-immigrant attitudes, and related issues. We will explore a variety of approaches to the study of Immigrant America, and we will analyze primary documents produced by Americans and by new arrivals. We will also examine how the institutions, structures and attitudes formed by America’s immigrant past shape the conditions for immigrants today and American conversations about them.    

 

History Through Disney

Disney
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Phillips
Meets: TR 12:30-1:45pm
Description:

"History through Disney” is designed to encourage students think about “big” topics in history through the lens of our beloved “Disney,” both Walt, the man who started the Disney empire of course, and the Disney Studios and Corporation.  Populism, The Age of Invention, Business Growth and Monopoly, Labor Unions and Labor Controversy, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Rise of American Conservatism, Gender Roles and the Nuclear Family, American Imperialism:  Disney was and is at the center of them all.  Some argue that Disney has, for most of the twentieth and now into the 21st century, provided the very cultural framework through which we understand everything from sports, to gender, race, ideas about what constitutes “entertainment,” work, even our understanding of history.  Throughout the semester, we will examine the extent to which this is the case and, if so, how it happened!  

 

Rise and Fall of the British Empire

rise
Instructor: Dr. Christopher Oldstone-Moore
Meets: TR 11:00am-12:15pm & 12:30-1:45pm
Description:

 More than any other single entity, the British Empire shaped the modern world. The United States is only one product of this empire. This course is a thematic exploration of British colonization and decolonization in Africa, India and China. Through novels and others sources, we will examine the complex social and cultural interaction of British, Asian and African societies, and consider the ways in which this mutual influence has forged the world we live in today.

 

 

Making Modern America

Modern
Instructor: Dr. Daniel Clark
Meets: MWF 1:00-1:50pm
Description:

This class will examine US history from Reconstruction through the 1960’s. It will emphasize the theme “how did we get here?” By looking at past as prologue, students will come away with appreciation for past events’ impact on shaping our modern world view. Topics such as race relations, culture, and politics will be featured, but special emphasis will be placed on working class history, which is often ignored in High School classes. This is an overview of the period, with the hope students will engage the material further through upper level classes which go into more depth on one topic, or simply through their own investigation. It is painless history, which asks students not to just memorize dates and facts, but to synthesize the material, thus developing their critical thinking skills.

HIST 313 – Topics in History
3 credits
Topics vary by instructor

Dr. Andrea Arrington-Sirois

Dr. Taylor Easum

Dr. Isaac Land

Dr. Christopher Oldstone-Moore

 

General Description:

“Topics in History” allows students to explore the discipline of history through focused study of a particular topic. Students learn to analyze and evaluate evidence, make and assess persuasive arguments, and understand multiple causation and the importance of context, continuity, and change over time. History majors may not count this course for credit in the major.

Foundational Studies Credit:
Historical Perspectives

Topics and Meeting Times:

 

Jim Crow and Apartheid

Jim Crow
Instructor: Dr. Andrea Arrington-Sirios
Meets: 
Online Asynchronous 
Description:

 This section of HIST 313 examines segregation policies and experiences in two contexts, the American South and South Africa.  Students will learn more about “Jim Crow” segregation in the U.S. and the apartheid system in South Africa.  By studying both of these examples of 20th century                   segregation, students will be able to compare and contrast the policies and experiences of people living under these policies.  In addition to exploring the history of segregation in these two places, students will also consider the legacies of Jim Crow and apartheid in the American South and South       Africa today. 

 

Slavery and Abolition

slavery

Instructor: Dr. Christopher Oldstone-Moore
Meets: Online
Description: 

Slavery and racism were central components of the rise of the modern capitalist economy in the Atlantic world. One of the most important and dramatic stories of modern history is the centuries-long, and still ongoing, campaign of Blacks and Whites to dismantle these institutions. Abolition was the first great political movement of the democratic age, from which many others emerged, including women’s suffrage. Using memoirs, art, songs, and other sources, this course will examine the triumphs and failures of abolition movements in Britain, the U.S. and Haiti since the late eighteenth century.

Southeast Asia

Instructor: Dr. Taylor Easum
Meets: MWF 10:00 - 10:50am & 11:00 - 11:50am

Description: 

Southeast Asia is made up of eleven nation-states, and an incredible diversity of cultures, beliefs, societies, and peoples. Southeast Asia has long been a crossroads of cultural exchange, regional and global trade, and religious conversion. For many students, this course will serve as an introduction to the modern history of this diverse region, and the impact of that history in the present, though we will focus our attention on the histories of Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam, with occasional forays into Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, and Malaysia. This course will focus on the history of the region, primarily from the nineteenth century to the present, through a close reading of key debates in the field, new research, and primary sources. Working in Southeast Asian history offers us an opportunity to look at larger themes of history from a unique perspective, and through the lens of less commonly used sources. In addition, this region provides what some might call a laboratory for larger processes of history, including colonialism and empire, the cold war, and other themes of world history. 

Genocide and Post-Genocide Societies

Genocide
Instructor: Dr. Isaac Land
Meets: MWF 12:00-12:50pm
Description:

This course takes a historical and comparative approach to genocide, including the Holocaust but extending well beyond it.  This subject matter will test your intellectual and emotional limits, again and again.  Why do people behave in these ways, and what does that say about us as human beings?  Is there any way for a traumatized society to move beyond the pain and make a serious attempt at peace, justice, and—if not forgiveness—then at least coexistence? How can we respond to people who seek to add insult to injury, and pretend that a genocide simply did not happen?  As an international community, why do we repeatedly say “never again,” and then continue to allow genocides to happen in the world?  Is there a way to spot the warning signs of a genocide before it happens and intervene before much harm has been done?  There will be no easy answers to any of these questions, and yet "we will never know" seems like an unacceptable response. This is a course about human nature at its worst, but surprisingly, along the way, we will see examples of human nature at its best as we examine the struggle to understand, the struggle to cope, and the struggle to respond in intelligent and constructive ways to the most destructive things that one group of people could do to another.

 

HIST 345 – Latin America/Latino Studies
3 credits
Area C

Instructor: Dr. Tim Hawkins
Meets: TR 11:00am-12:15pm
Description: 

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America and its diaspora which is designed to provide students with an understanding of the primary forces that have shaped the history of this complex region: the colonial experience and nation-building; economic development and dependence; social inequality and political revolution; cultural and ethnic diversity; immigration and the Latino experience; and the role the United States plays in the region.

Foundational Studies Credit

Upper Division Integrative Elective

HIST 404 – Internship in Public History
3 credits
Area General Elective

Instructor: Dr. Don Maxwell
Meets: TR 3:45-4:45pm
Description:

Introduces the major issues and careers available in public history, including museums, archives, national parks, historic preservations, and oral history. Includes an on-site internship experience.

Prerequisites

Departmental approval

 

HIST 417 – U.S. in Crisis, 1917-1945
3 credits
Area A

Instructor: Dr. Dan Clark
Meets: MWF 11:00-11:50am
Description:

How the United States responded to the challenges of World War I, the Twenties, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.

 

HIST 421/PSCI 465 – U.S. Diplomacy
3 credits
Area A

Instructor: Dr. Anne Foster
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15pm
Description:

Decision-making in a selected number of crisis situations in the history of United States foreign relations.

 

HIST 459 –Mapping History
3 credits
Area General Elective

Instructor: Dr. Taylor Easum
Meets: MWF 1:00-1:50pm
Description:

This course examines a historical topic through a spatial lens, focusing on maps as historical primary sources, as a means to study historical evidence, and as an effective way to present historical research. Organized around a historical theme, this course explores the history of mapping and cartography, the role of space and spatial representation in history, and the use of emerging technologies to study the past and to communicate historical research to the public.

 

HIST 466 –Modern Britain
3 credits
Area B

Instructor: Dr. Isaac Land
Meets: MWF 2:00-2:50pm
Description:

This course examines the major themes of modern British history: American and French Revolutions, political reform, industrial society, imperial ideology, “The Woman Question,” the impact of two world wars, and the decline of Britain’s international pre-eminence. Throughout the course attention is paid to ideas of “Englishness” and their impact on the formation of the modern English national identity, with emphasis on the multi-cultural make-up of British society in the modern period.

 

HIST 498 – Hist&Cult Mod Afr II: Nat
3 credits
Area C

Instructor: Dr. Andrea Arrington
Meets: MWF 12:30-1:45pm
Description:

 

Undergraduate Courses (AFRI)

AFRI 113 — Foundations of African and African American Studies
3 credits

Instructor: Rev. Terry Clark

Meets: MWF 10:00-10:50am, 12:00-12:50pm, 1:00-1:50pm
Foundational Studies Credit: Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:

An exploration of the philosophical, political, historical, and sociological components that form the basis of African and African American studies.

 

AFRI 212 — African American Cultural Traditions
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Terry Clark
Meets:TR 9:30-10:45am
Foundational Studies Credit:
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:

A focused and analytical examination of Black thought, ideology, and culture, as well as the institutional aspects of Black American life.

 

AFRI 222 — African Cultural Traditions
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Andrea Arrington-Sirois
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Foundational Studies Credit:
Global Perspectives and Cultural Diversity
Description:

An overview of African cultural thought and practices. Emphasis on understanding specific aspects of African cultural life, such as religion, aesthetics, political organization, and social institutions, and how these cultural areas relate to the struggle of liberation.

 

AFRI 312 – The African Diaspora
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Colleen Haas
Meets: Online Asynchronous
Foundational Studies Credit:
Upper Division Integrative Elective
Description:

This course traces the spread of African culture and ideas through the African Diaspora as a result of slavery and colonialism, and the ways that African traditions were re-interpreted and combined with European culture. Topics include: ideas of the Diaspora, religious beliefs, food traditions, music, and kinship traditions in the United States, Caribbean, and South America.

 

AFRI 329 - Music in Africa
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Colleen Haas
Meets: TR 2:00-3:15pm
Foundational Studies Credit:
Upper Division Integrative Elective
Description:

An examination of music making in African cultures. Topics include a general survey of major principles of African music, and case studies of specific national and ethnic traditions. An underlying theme is the relation of musical structures and practices to African social and cultural systems and institutions.

 

AFRI 351 – Modern Africa II
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Andrea Arrington-Sirois
Meets: MWF 12:00-12:50pm
Description:
 

This course will discuss the growth of nationalist movements, a comparative study of their ideologies, the achievement of independence, and the evolution of contemporary Africa.

 

 

 Graduate Courses

All classes are online. Each class meets synchronously for a bloc of time one evening each week.

HIST 539A – Women's History in the United States
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Lisa Phillips
Meets: Tuesday evenings online
Description:

U.S. Women’s History is more accurately described as the history of women, of gendered relationships, and of power and how it’s wielded.  The course is designed to give you an overview of the history of how women experienced life in North America and the U.S.  We will cover topics as diverse as “Native” American/European contact, witchcraft in the colonies, the American Revolution, women’s role in shaping the new United States of America, slavery, patriarchy, and the Civil War, women and work in the late 1800s, women’s push for the vote and access to the “public sphere” in the early 1900s, Rosie the Riveter during World War II, the June Cleaver ideal and reality in the 1950s, birth control and women’s “libbers” in the 1960s, women’s push into male-dominated professions in the 1970s, and women “currently” (difficult to define).  A graduate level history course, we will cover the content above AND delve into four award-winning books at a much deeper level.   While still paying close attention to content, we will analyze them for HOW the historians drew their conclusions, what sources (secondary and primary) they used, how they organized the material, what they argue about women, about gender, about the time period, and how their work changed our collective understanding of colonial and U.S. History.  This kind of analysis is the stuff of history, it’s the process in which professional historians are engaged, and it’s what you all, as graduate students in History, are being trained to do.

 

HIST 571 – Modern Russia
3 credits
Instructor: Dr.Barbara Skinner
Meets: Monday evenings online
Description:

Late Russian Empire reforms and cultural, social, political response. The rise and fall of the Soviet Union; the Bolshevik revolution, the Stalin era, Gorbachev, and post-Soviet challenges.

 

HIST 600 –Historical Research and Methods
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Anne Foster
Meets: Thursday evenings online
Description:

The course focuses primarily on the skills needed to conduct historical research with some discussion of the theoretical bases for the study of history. Students will learn how to use databases, analyze historical documents, evaluate articles and monographs, and write book reviews and historiographical analysis.  They will study the “history of history” by reading foundational texts in the field.   

 

HIST 620 – Reading Seminar: The United States
3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Ann Chirhart
Meets: Wednesday evenings online
Description:

The course focuses on mastery of content and historical arguments about the theme.  Writing assignments focus on secondary sources, whether assigned in class or as part of a research project.